Author Archives: Deb

FreeBSD Foundation Spring Fundraising Campaign!

We're kicking off our Spring Fundraising Campaign! Our goal this year is to raise $1,000,000 with a spending budget of $900,000.

As we embark on our 15th year of serving the FreeBSD Project and community, we are proud of how we've helped FreeBSD become the most innovative, realiable, and high-performance operating system. We are doing this by:
  • funding development projects,
  • having an internal technical staff available to work on small and large projects, fixing problems, and areas of system administration and release engineering,
  • providing legal support,
  • funding conferences and summits that allow face-to-face interaction and collaboration between FreeBSD contributors, users, and advocates,
  • and advocating for and educating people about FreeBSD by providing high-quality brochures, white papers, and the FreeBSD Journal.

We can't do this without you! You can help by making a donation today.

Help spread the word by posting on FaceBook, Twitter, your blogs, and asking your company to help. Did you know there are thousands of companies that wil match their employee's donations? Check with your company to see if you can automatically double your donation by having your company match your donation.

Thanks for your support!

FreeBSD Journal Issue #2 is Now Available!



The FreeBSD Journal Issue #2 is now available! You can get it on Google Play, iTunes, and Amazon. In this issue you will find captivating articles on pkg(8), Poudriere, PBI Format, plus great pieces on hwpmc(4) and Journaled Soft-updates. If you haven't already subscribed, now is the time!

The positive feedback from both the FreeBSD and outside communities has been incredible. In less than two months, we have signed up over 1,000 subscribers. This shows the hunger the FreeBSD community has had for a FreeBSD focused publication. We are also working on a dynamic version of the magazine that can be read in many web browsers, including those that run on FreeBSD.

The Journal is guided by a dedicated and enthusiastic editorial board made up of people from across the FreeBSD community. The editorial board is responsible for the acquisition and vetting of content for the magazine.

You can find out more information about the Journal by going to https://www.freebsdfoundation.org/journal. Or, subscribe now by going to the following links for the device you'd like to download to:

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Your subscriptions and the advertising revenue the Journal receives will help offset the costs of publishing this magazine. So, consider signing up for a subscription today! 

We know you are going to like what you see in the Journal! Please help us spread the word by tweeting, blogging, and posting on your FaceBook page. You can also help by asking your company to put an ad in the Journal. For advertising information contact [email protected]

And, don't forget you can support the Journal and FreeBSD by making a donation today!

The FreeBSD Journal is Now Available!

We are pleased to announce the FreeBSD Journal is now available! This is a new, FreeBSD focused, online publication. 

You can find out how to subscribe to the Journal by going to www.freebsdjournal.com. Or, go to the following links for the device you'd like to download to:

To get the Kindle App click here 
To get the Apple app click here 
To get the Android App click here

Here's the letter the editorial board wrote for this inaugural issue:

Welcome to the first issue of the FreeBSD Journal. A brand new, professionally produced, on-line magazine available from the various app stores, including Apple iTunes, Google Play, and Amazon Kindle.

What you will find in the upcoming issues are feature-length articles and columns that address the entirety of the FreeBSD community. Coverage will be diverse with topics including: managing large scale system deployments, application development, systems programming, embedded systems, academic research, and general software development. All using FreeBSD.

Issue #1 is dedicated to FreeBSD 10, the latest in the FreeBSD Project's line of major releases.  The release of FreeBSD 10 brings many new features not seen in other open source operating systems, including a brand new compiler toolchain based on LLVM, as well as mature support for ZFS as a first class kernel-based filesystem.

The Journal is guided by an editorial board made up of people from across the FreeBSD community, including, John Baldwin, Daichi Goto, Joseph Kong, Dru Lavigne, Michael Lucas, Marshall Kirk McKusick, George Neville-Neil, Hiroki Sato, and Robert Watson.  The editorial board is responsible for the acquisition and vetting of content for the magazine.  The editor is Jim Maurer who is the person with whom our authors work most closely getting their pieces into shape for publishing.  Jim has a long history in the technical publishing business, having worked with Scientific American and the Association for Computing Machinery.

The magazine will publish six issues per year.  The editorial board has planned the first year of issues that will cover topics including Networking, Virtualization, Development Tools, Support for new Hardware Features, and the new software packaging system for FreeBSD, pkgng.

The FreeBSD Journal is financially supported by the FreeBSD Foundation, the 501(c)3 charitable organization whose sole purpose is to help the FreeBSD Project grow and flourish.  Your subscriptions and the advertising revenue the Journal receives help to offset the money the Foundation needs to put in to support the Journal.

We know you'll like what you see in the Journal and hope that you'll let everyone you know about our new magazine.

Sincerley,
FreeBSD Journal Editorial Board

FreeBSD Foundation Announces 2013 Fundraising Results

The board of directors had a very productive meeting in Berkeley in January. We worked on our strategic plan and other topics that greatly benefited by working together at an in-person meeting.

We thank you, the FreeBSD community and consumers, who support FreeBSD in many ways.  Thank you for your donations ranging from $5 to over $200,000. Thank you for your tireless efforts of supporting the Project by developing code, writing for and about FreeBSD, helping with conferences and summits, and advocating for FreeBSD.




We have our final fundraising results from 2013 and are pleased with the results. In 2013 we raised $768,562 from 1659 donors. If you compare the number with 2012, of $771,193 from 1855 donors, it was a little lower. The difference is primarily because 2012 blew out its goal of raising $500,000.

We have already started our 2014 fundraising efforts. As of the end of January we are just under $40,000. Our goal is to raise $1,000,000. We are currently finalizing our 2014 budget. We plan to publish both our 2013 financial report and our 2014 budget soon.

Please consider making a donation in 2014! It's easy, just click here to make your donation!

Thank you again for your support! We look forward to continuing our support of the FreeBSD Project and community in 2014.

Last Day to Make 2013 Donation to The FreeBSD Foundation

It's hard to believe that 2014 is just around the corner! We've raised around $660,000 so far as of 7PM Colorado Time December 30. We also have $75,000 in pledges that we should be receiving soon! We only have around 24 hours left to reach our goal of raising $1,000,000. Here is my plea to ask for your help. Please consider making a donation. It is so easy to do. Just click here to make a donation online or to find out where to mail a check. If you file US taxes, most likely your donation will be tax-deductible. If you send a check, please mail it tomorrow (December 31). For the donation to count towards 2013, the envelope has to be postmarked by December 31. Writing 2013 donation on your check doesn't work for our accounting.

This year has been amazing. Because of our successful fundraising campaign last year, we were able to support the FreeBSD Project and community in so many ways. You can read my appeal here to see where we spent the money this year.

There are three areas where we've grown the most. One is our FreeBSD development work. We now have two staff members working on FreeBSD projects, a full-time employee working on FreeBSD System Administration and Release Engineering work, and we have a Project Manager who is not only overseeing all of our funded projects, but also working on project roadmaps and helping facilitating collaboration between our corporate users and FreeBSD developers. This is helping to bring in more corporate sponsors too.

We've also increased our FreeBSD advocacy by producing professional FreeBSD marketing brochures, white papers, literature, and our new FreeBSD Journal that will be debuting in a few weeks!

Lastly, we've spent over $100,000 on hardware to improve the FreeBSD infrastructure. This equipment resides in our four co-location facilities at NYI, Sentex, Yahoo!, and ISC.

Our End-of-Year newsletter highlights everything we supported this last year. Take a few minutes to read up on why we need your donations and how we spend the money.

Thank you for your support!

Deb Goodkin
Secretary/Treasurer
The FreeBSD Foundation

P.S. Making a donation is quick and easy! Click here to make a donation now.


Faces of FreeBSD – Isabell Long

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Isabell's Story


My name is Isabell Long, and I am a 19-year-old living in the south of England. I'm a Ruby on Rails web developer at a social media startup named Gerraroom and a volunteer staff member of the freenode IRC network. I love open data and—on the non-tech side—good food, music (both playing and listening) and learning. Before FreeBSD, I contributed documentation and support for Ubuntu, which was a good introduction into the world of open source.

Friends hinted that I should try FreeBSD by posting me burned CDs of releases. Then in 2011, I decided to participate in the Google Code-In contest, completing documentation-related tasks and becoming heavily involved in the documentation project afterwards. I became a documentation committer in April 2012. The new committer mentoring process proved very useful and that, plus the accepting community of FreeBSD, are reasons why I stay involved.

Thanks to FreeBSD Foundation funding, I was able to attend my first overseas conference at EuroBSDcon 2013 in Malta. Apart from the experience of going to a country I’d never visited before, meeting people who I only knew on IRC and seeing some people I met at the DevSummits in Cambridge was one of the best bits. The documentation sessions were very useful and I completed a few tasks on the website and Handbook during my time there and afterwards. I'm looking forward to having a few similarly productive days in Bulgaria next year.

As a thank you for providing resources to keep FreeBSD going and enabling committers like me to travel to conferences, I donated a small amount in Malta to the FreeBSD Foundation as I strongly believe that giving where possible keeps positivity going and one day, that repays.

Isabell Long




Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

Faces of FreeBSD – Kevin Martin

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Kevin's Story


My name is Kevin Martin, and I am the CEO and Founder of pair Networks, Inc. I've been a computer person since I was very young. My father made a wise investment in the very first Model 5150 of the IBM PC. He brought home the 64KB model with two floppy disk drives in October 1981, and I immediately moved up from writing games on the HP-41C, and in BASIC on notebook paper.

In junior high and high school, I was "that kid" who helped fix computers, whether in the school's library or main office.  When I attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (for Computer Science, naturally), there were SunOS 4.1 workstations available to students, and I jumped into BSD-flavored UNIX with both feet.  Soon I was an assistant at the Image Processing Lab, which had the latest and greatest equipment on campus.

My other passion is pinball. As a pre-teen I hung out in the arcade when my mother went to her bowling league.  In college I discovered pinball tournaments, and started attending. Eventually I took over the Professional & Amateur Pinball Association and started running the world's largest pinball tournaments, twice yearly, just outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  More recently, I founded Replay Foundation, a non-profit that promotes the preservation, restoration, and enjoyment of pinball, with an emphasis on the player experience.

In the summer of 1995, I founded pair Networks, with an eye towards simple Web design projects.  I’d been running an FTP/Web site called "The Pinball Archive" since early 1993, and was paying a series of obscure ISPs to host it. While working on ideas for pair, I noticed that the latest ISP I was using, Best Internet Communications, was migrating their servers from BSDI to FreeBSD.

Curious, I borrowed a server from my uncle and installed FreeBSD 2.0.5. I was impressed and immediately hooked.  My experience with SunOS, combined with the power of FreeBSD, made it possible to launch my own hosting company—which is what pair Networks became.  In January 1996, our T-1 to Digital Express came online, and pair was launched with just a couple of Pentium servers, all running FreeBSD 2.1.  The Pinball Archive had found its permanent home.

Over the past 18 years, FreeBSD has been an asset to our operations, and while we have branched out a bit, we still primarily use FreeBSD and promote it whenever possible.  FreeBSD is a terrific technology with a terrific community.

Kevin Martin

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

Faces of FreeBSD – Shteryana Shopova

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Shteryana's Story


My name is Shteryana Shopova. I am 31 years old and live in Sofia, the capital of a small East European country called Bulgaria. I have a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Sofia and am finishing a Master’s degree in Computer and Network Security there. I was a guest lecturer at the Network Security course at my Alma Mater this semester, which, along with organizing EuroBSDCon 2014, is one of the biggest challenges I am facing in the next several months.

Away from computers, I enjoy the company of my family and friends, a glass of good wine, and outdoor sports.  I was on my school's female basketball team for a few years, and I still enjoy playing the game (I’m good at it). I learned to ski as a kid and I’m happy to be back on the ski slopes in Europe after suffering a serious ankle injury a couple of years ago. I am praying for lots of snow this winter.

My first exposure to FreeBSD was in 2004 when I was working for a company producing network devices. The OS that we developed and ran on the devices was based on WindRiver's vxWorks, with a TCP/IP stack derived from the very early ones from FreeBSD/NetBSD.  I often found myself looking at the projects' CVS repositories for solutions of problems that I encountered at work. In 2005, I did the Google Summer of Code program for FreeBSD, coding the client side of the SNMP protocol. Since all FreeBSD development has to happen on FreeBSD-current, I installed FreeBSD on my laptop—alongside the Windows and Slackware Linux I was running on it at the time. Several months later I realized that apart from FreeBSD, I hadn't booted the other two operating systems in months. So I wiped them out.

I try to help the FreeBSD Project any way I can. I am maintaining the native SNMP daemon and client code, doing bugfixes in networking related parts, testing the OS a lot by following the HEAD (a.k.a FreeBSD-CURRENT), and trying out new stuff that gets added there. The last couple of years I had to put off most of the technical work I do for FreeBSD in favor of finishing my formal education. Nevertheless, I continue to help by advocating for FreeBSD. I've given
FreeBSD-related talks on several occasions, organized a BSD-dedicated track at OpenFest (the largest local OpenSource conference), and proctored BSDCG certification exams (the equivalent of LPIs for BSD system administrators). I am also on the board of the EuroBSDCon Foundation in the role of the EuroBSDCon 2014 Organizing Committee Chair.

Why FreeBSD? I think it’s the only OS that so nicely fits all my needs. I appreciate the modern and easy-to-administer filesystem—ZFS, plenty of virtualization options including bhyve, the fast and modern networking stack, plenty of third party software via the ports and packages, and more. I value the extensive and good documentation, and the high quality and liberally licensed source code (so I can experiment, make modifications, or fix problems myself without having to wait for upstream patches, or even sell it without any legal concerns). Finally, by interacting with the FreeBSD community and developers—the entire BSD community in fact—I've learned so much and continue to learn. I think it has shaped me as the professional I am today, and I am very thankful for that.

I think the FreeBSD Foundation is doing a great job of supporting the project. As a developer, the most important activities of the Foundation are funding developers to work on various projects, sponsoring FreeBSD-related technical events, and giving travel grants to developers so that we have a chance to meet physically and discuss ideas, projects, and problems. A couple of years ago I added SNMPv3 authentication, encryption, and access control to bsnmpd(1), along with a module for monitoring wireless interfaces. People had asked for those additions for some time; I doubt I would have had the time and resources to implement them if the Foundation hadn't sponsored me.

I want to appeal to everyone: if you like FreeBSD, please consider a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation, so we can make FreeBSD even better. And I hope to see you at EuroBSDCon next year in Sofia!


Shteryana Shopova



Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

Faces of FreeBSD – Brooks Davis

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Brooks' Story



I’m a Senior Software Engineer for SRI International, working on multiple clean slate research projects using FreeBSD as the operating system for research on the hardware-software interface.  A  FreeBSD committer since 2001 and core team member from 2006 through 2012, I've built an HPC cluster based on FreeBSD, implemented an internal source code sharing system with FreeBSD and Trac, and most recently helped port FreeBSDto an open source CPU to enable architecture, systems, and security research.  I've also helped drive our transition from a GNU toolchain to a more modern LLVM based toolchain.

Outside the world of computing I’m a foodie, gardener, home brewer of beer, mead and cider, woodworker, and blacksmith.

My first exposure to FreeBSD was a floppy disk-based SLIP router installed in my high school in 1993/4 by a local FreeBSD-based ISP.  Distracted as a Solaris admin during college, I returned to FreeBSD almost immediately after graduation when FreeBSDmade it trivial to set up a PPP router at home.  The Aerospace Corporation, my first post-college job, involved working with FreeBSD due to our extensive use of dummynet in our research labs.  Over the next decade-plus I spread FreeBSDfrom the lab to the largest computing cluster at the company and to an internal sourceforge.net-like system hosting over 350 projects.

Now I work to make FreeBSD better, such as working on toolchain and build system issues with a focus on medium to large embedded systems.  Our research group developed an open source CPU based on the 64-bit MIPS ISA that we use to explore the hardware-software interface.  I maintained Clang and LLVM ports, enhanced the FreeBSD build and release system to work without root permissions, and wrote and modified device drivers for our platform. I also maintained a number of high performance computing related ports including Sun Grid Engine and Ganglia as well as a number of Trac modules.  

One of the reasons I like FreeBSD is the community involved in the process of building a principled, technically-advanced operating system platform. Not only do we produce a great product, but we have fun doing it.

I appreciate how the FreeBSD Foundationhas helped me both directly and indirectly to attend conferences, developer’s meetings, vendor summits, and events like Google Summer of Code mentors summits.  I’ve received travel grants for a number of these events and the FreeBSD Foundation sponsors many BSD conferences where I have presented, including AsiaBSDCon, BSDCan, EuroBSDCon, and BSDDay Argentina.

Donating to the FreeBSD Foundation is an easy way to support FreeBSD. Even the smallest donation helps as your mere presence as a donator demonstrates community support. I'm excited by the early results of the FreeBSD Foundation’s recent expansion of staff and look forward to continued growth.  I donate every year.

Brooks Davis


Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/



Faces of FreeBSD – Reid Linnemann

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Reid's Story


My name is Reid Linnemann. I am 32 years old and work at Spectra Logic Corporation (Boulder, CO). I grew up in Edmond, Oklahoma, graduating from Oklahoma State University with a BS in Computer Science in 2004.

I worked at the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (Stillwater, OK) developing Zope and Plone applications interfacing with SQL databases and single sign-on services, and CymSTAR, LLC (Broken Arrow, OK) developing and modifying real-time simulation software and implementing DIS for virtual air refueling simulation. I was part of the team that designed and built CymSTAR's  KC-135 BOWST trainer for the Mobility Air Force, and contributed to the development of MAF DMO virtual air refueling standards.

I am a versed C and Python programmer, with a good bit of Java, Perl, Ruby, C++, and other various and sundry languages under my belt. I’m interested in 8 bit AVR microcontrollers in my free time.

I was first introduced to FreeBSD in 1999 when a particular greybeard (the senior technician for my shift at a local ISP) played XBill on an X server in WindowMaker. He said it ran on his FreeBSD machine at home across a dedicated 64k subscriber line, displayed in a little window on his workstation. I was astounded, quickly taken in by the FreeBSD users on my shift, and spent a bleary-eyed overnight session with a pair of coworkers who helped me run FreeBSD 3.4 on my own computer.

FreeBSD was remarkable, available at no cost and developed by a group of people scattered across the globe. Its historical lineage to BSD, design philosophy, and professional community stood out. I could examine the source code, and read reams of manual pages documenting every program, libc function, and configuration file if I wanted.

I used the system to build and install ports, and explored, getting actively involved in the mailing lists and forums, studying, passing on my own limited knowledge to those who could benefit from it. I pursued my career in the open source software world, learning the differences in BSD and GNU licensing and the fragmented nature of Linux distributions, realizing the FreeBSD community was more mature and well distributed about industry, education, and research. Everything steered me towards working with and on FreeBSD.

I decided to work for FreeBSD in a professional capacity by the time I was 30, and so here I am, at Spectra Logic, fulfilling that goal. I am part of a team developing a product that will be powered by FreeBSD. Now I find myself in the midst of several prominent FreeBSDdevelopers, the most professional and disciplined software engineers I’ve met, and look forward to learning from them, contributing to FreeBSD, and becoming more involved in the project. Perhaps you'll see me one day at BSDCan or EuroBSDCon. I hope so.

Reid Linnemann

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

Faces of FreeBSD – Gabor Pali

Faces of FreeBSD

Each week we are going to share a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who contributes financially to the foundation.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Gábor’s Story



My name is Gábor Páli, I am 31 years old, from Hungary, and I teach (and study) functional programming at the Eötvös Loránd University, Faculty of Informatics (Budapest).  I have a master’s degree (Debrecen, Hungary) and a doctorate (Cluj-Napoca, Romania) in Computer Science.

Before this I was a game engine programmer at Invictus Games, working on Project Torque (known as Level-R outside North America), then a research intern at Chalmers University of Technology (Gothenburg, Sweden), and recently at the Computer Laboratory (Cambridge, UK), participating in research projects on functional programming and operating systems, such as Feldspar and Mirage.

When not working, I am an average geek who enjoys reading books on science, philosophy, and art, chatting with friends, playing good old computer games, watching art movies, drawing, listening to underground music, and consuming excessive amounts of fine Japanese or Chinese teas.

I discovered FreeBSD in 2000 while working on my master’s. I met János Háber, who admired the technical merits of FreeBSD and recommended it over the popular and widespread GNU/Linux distributions. I downloaded FreeBSD 4.3-RELEASE, found it reliable, consistent, easy to install, update and use. I especially liked the Ports Collection, as it helped me find further useful and valuable free software.

I’ve contributed to the FreeBSD Project since 2008: I translated the complete FreeBSDHandbook and other documentation into Hungarian and took over and revitalized the FreeBSD stack of the Haskell programming language, including making FreeBSD Tier-1 for the Glasgow Haskell Compiler and providing ports for hundreds of third party Haskell libraries. 

I volunteered to take over organization of the EuroBSDcon FreeBSD Developer Summits in 2010 and have organized in Karlsruhe (Germany), Maarssen (Netherlands), Warsaw (Poland) and most recently in St. Julian's (Malta).  I’ve run a mini version of EuroBSDcon, called BSD-Day, in Budapest (Hungary), Bratislava (Slovakia), Vienna (Austria), and Naples (Italy).

I’m secretary of the FreeBSD Core Team (since 2012), and maintain the agenda, organize meetings, publish internal, external reports and notices, handle commit bit requests for the source code repository, collaborate with the FreeBSD Foundation, and remind the Core Team members about their pending tasks. I also manage the quarterly status reports.

I like FreeBSD because of the community, and the ability to find and push my limits. I enjoy contributing toFreeBSD because it inspires me and gives me hands-on experience that can’t be bought. I enjoy learning from FreeBSD experts around the globe, and am impressed with what has been achieved over the years. I recognize the outstanding stability and reliability of FreeBSD, the ability to configure systems to maximize efficiency, and FreeBSD’s use as a research platform. I appreciate how the FreeBSD Projectwelcomes and utilizes innovative ideas.

The FreeBSD Foundation gave me a travel grant for EuroBSDcon 2012. They were a main sponsor of the BSD-Day events, and covered half the cost of the Developer Summit in Malta. I am very grateful for this support, as they would not be possible without the generous funds.

The Developer Summits allow developers the space to personally meet and to discuss issues they could not over the Internet. It’s important to be able to attach a face to an Internet personality; sometimes the harshest, stubborn members are the nicest people in real life.

The BSD-Day events that I organize allow cities and countries to have their own BSD conference at a much smaller cost. BSD-Days have less formalities and pressure, yet they retain most of the traditions and ambience of the large conferences of EuroBSDcon, on a smaller budget.

Donating to the FreeBSD Foundation is a great way to express your appreciation for the work of the FreeBSD Project.  Your donation makes it possible for developers to dedicate their time to complete long-awaited projects, or brings developers from overseas to technical conferences such as EuroBSDcon. This is something that would not happen without your support.

Gábor Páli

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

Faces of FreeBSD – Colin Percival


Faces of FreeBSD

We are pleased to be running our Faces of FreeBSD series again! Every week we’ll be sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. It may be someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who contributes financially to the foundation. This story comes from Colin Percival whose company is a 2013 Silver Donor.

This is a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy our first 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Colin’s Story





It was 1999 when my parents signed up for the height of luxury in home internet access: an “always on” 2Mbps cable modem.  We had four computers, networked with thinwire coax. We needed to share this connection, so my older brother and I set up a NAT box, running OpenBSD, which he heard was the best operating system for the purpose.

The hard drive we had scavenged for the NAT box died a few months later. I had to reinstall the system onto a new hard drive and spent hours trying to reinstall OpenBSD without success. Then I heard that FreeBSD had a much easier installer. Yes, I started using FreeBSDbecause of *sysinstall*.

Thus FreeBSD became my default UNIX of choice—and why not?  It was free, stable, had good performance, was well documented, and it avoided the political and religious discussions so pervasive in the world of Linux and GNU.

I headed to Oxford University for my doctorate a few years later, to work on "distributed computing" and extend my undergraduate work—calculating the quadrillionth bit of Pi using spare CPU cycles on a thousand plus Windows machines from around the Internet. Naturally, I turned to FreeBSD for the server to manage all these systems.

But I became distracted, concerned about the security of my server, and understanding my limitations as a system administrator (and that "fools rush in where angels fear to tread"). I solved the problem of my system administration inadequacies by building a tool to help me—and thus FreeBSD Updatewas born.  I presented this at the BSDCon'03 conference, which is where I first met FreeBSD developers, including Jacques Vidrine (the FreeBSD Security Officer) and Robert Watson.

I was offered a FreeBSD commit bit in 2004 with Robert as mentor; and Jacques invited me to join the FreeBSD Security Team. When Jacques stepped down from his role in order to work for a fruit company based in Cupertino, I took the reigns as Security Officer, and between security advisories, I imported into the FreeBSD base system what remain my two largest contributions to FreeBSDthus far: FreeBSD Update and Portsnap.

I stepped down as FreeBSD Security Officer in 2012 to devote more time to my growing startup company. My only significant code contributions in the past two years have been from ongoing efforts to improve support for FreeBSD on the Amazon EC2 cloud computing platform.

While my "day job" of running the Tarsnap online backup service has kept me too busy to contribute much code, I contribute to FreeBSD by supporting the FreeBSD Foundation.  Every year Tarsnap sponsors open source software by an amount equal to its December operating profits, and I'm proud to say that in 2013 Tarsnap is a Silver Sponsor of both the FreeBSD Foundation and the BSDCan conference.

The FreeBSD Foundation continues to benefit all of us. I run FreeBSD on my laptop, and it works well there—mainly due to Foundation-funded work, adding support for recent Intel GPU hardware.  While maintaining systems for Tarsnap, I make use of the new packaging system (pkg), which the Foundation contributes hardware towards.

To improve support for FreeBSD on EC2, I've been working closely with the FreeBSD Release Engineering team, where Glen Barber (now a FreeBSD Foundation employee) has kept the release process moving very smoothly.  The FreeBSD Developer Summits at BSDCan and EuroBSDCon—opportunities to meet other FreeBSD developers and discuss development plans face to face—have also been supported by the FreeBSD Foundation.

FreeBSD is an amazing operating system, and the FreeBSD Foundation does great work supporting it.  Like so many other busy FreeBSD users, I cannot contribute as much code as I would like, but via the FreeBSD Foundation I can help other developers write the code I don't have time for.

Colin Percival 

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/



FreeBSD Foundation’s Year-End Fundraising Campaign!

Dear FreeBSD Community,
Your donations have helped make FreeBSD the best open source operating system available! By investing in The FreeBSD Foundation you have helped us keep FreeBSD a high-performance, secure, and stable operating system.
Thanks to people like you, the FreeBSD Foundation has been proudly supporting the FreeBSD Project and community for over 13 years now. We are incredibly grateful for all the support we receive from you and so many individuals and organizations that value FreeBSD. As of this writing we have raised $427,000 towards our goal of raising $1,000,000. Would you consider making a gift to support our work in 2014?
Donations can easily be made here: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/.
This year your donations helped FreeBSD by:
  • Funding development projects to improve FreeBSD, including: Native iSCSI kernel stack, Updated Intel graphics chipset support, Integration of Newcons, UTF-8 console support, Superpages for ARM architecture, and Layer 2 networking modernization and performance improvements.
  • Hiring two more staff members to help with FreeBSD development projects, security, and release engineering.
  • Educating the public and promoting FreeBSD. We are preparing the debut our new online magazine, the FreeBSD Journal. We created high-quality brochures to teach people about FreeBSD. We also visited companies to help facilitate collaboration efforts with the Project.
  • Sponsoring BSD conferences and summits in Europe, Japan, Canada, and the US.
  • Protecting FreeBSD IP and providing legal support to the Project.
  • Purchasing hardware to build and improve FreeBSD project infrastructure.
But are you aware of the tangible benefits derived from our support of the FreeBSD community? Providing travel grants to FreeBSD volunteers is a great way to invest in the future of FreeBSD. One person we sponsored was Google Summer of Code student Mike Ma, who had the chance to present his work at EuroBSDCon. During his presentation he received valuable input that will help improve and verify his GSoC work. By attending the conference, he had the opportunity to meet passionate FreeBSD developers who inspired him to learn as much as he could about their different projects. This encouraged him to continue working with his mentor and get involved in his mentor’s work as well as some lldb work.
Now that Mike’s back at his university, he's been busy promoting and advocating for FreeBSD. In fact he's so passionate about the Project now that he convinced a friend who is working on programming languages to work on the clang project, because it's relevant to his own work.
This one investment helped FreeBSD by providing an environment for a student to get more involved in the Project, and bring that enthusiasm back to his university to promote FreeBSD and encourage more students to get involved. This is an investment in the next generation of FreeBSD developers.
Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. Click here to make a donation.
Thank you for your support!
Sincerely,
Deb Goodkin
Secretary/Treasurer
The FreeBSD Foundation

Glen Barber Joins The FreeBSD Foundation

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce that Glen Barber has joined the Foundation's growing team of technical staff.

Glen has been involved with FreeBSD since 2007, and is currently a member of the FreeBSD Release Engineering and Cluster Administration teams.  Glen will continue supporting the FreeBSD Project through those roles, in addition to maintaining the FreeBSD Foundation's own servers and equipment.

As part of his role Glen will support the Release Engineering team by improving the release build process.  This includes the generation and release of virtual machine images, enhanced support for embedded targets, package building infrastructure, and release quality assurance tools.

Glen resides in Pennsylvania, USA.

FreeBSD Foundation Announces Ed Maste is New Director of Project Development

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce Ed Maste's new role as the Foundation's part-time Director of Project Development.  Ed has served on the Foundation's board for two years, and has stepped down in order to accept this new position.

In this position, Ed will manage the Foundation's sponsored work, including projects funded under specific grants, operational support and project development undertaken by the Foundation's permanent technical staff. Working with the Foundation's Board of Directors, Ed will identify and document specific areas of future project work interest. This roadmap planning will include coordination with FreeBSD consumers and the FreeBSD community.

"2012 represented an inflection point in the Foundation's history,'' said Justin T. Gibbs, President of the FreeBSD Foundation. "The Foundation has a stated goal of investing in permanent staff through 2013. With Ed taking on this new position I'm excited by the Foundation's increased capacity to manage our project development and operational support.''

Ed has over ten years of experience in companies building products on FreeBSD, in both technical and managerial roles. He resides in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

Raise a Million – Spend a Million!

FreeBSD is internationally recognized as an innovative leader in providing a high-performance, secure, and stable operating system. Our mission is to continue and increase our support and funding to keep FreeBSD at the forefront of operating system technology. But, we can’t do this without your help!

Last year with your generosity, we raised over $770,000. This allowed us to not only achieve our goal, but to exceed it by over $250,000.

This year, with your help, we will do more.
This year we will double the amount we spend.
This year we will invest $1,000,000 to support and promote FreeBSD.

What will the Foundation accomplish with your donation in 2013?
• Spend almost $600,000 on software development projects for FreeBSD.
• Support the Release Engineering and Security teams with paid staff time.
• Grow to five technical staff members by year-end.
• Support BSD conferences around the globe, in Europe, Japan, Canada, and the USA.
• Spend over $130,000 on hardware to maintain and improve FreeBSD project infrastructure.
• Grow the FreeBSD community through marketing and outreach to users and businesses.
• Protect the FreeBSD trademarks and provide the project with access to legal counsel.

We have kicked off the new year with 3 newly funded projects, and are actively soliciting additional project proposals now. We've added one new technical staff member and are in the process of adding more.

Please support the Foundation during our Spring Fundraising Drive, and help us raise $100,000 from 1000 donors between April 16th and May 30th.

We can’t do this without you!  Just go to http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate to make your donation.  Then talk to your employer to either match your gift or to make their own donation.

Thank you for your support!

The FreeBSD Foundation

FreeBSD Foundation is Soliciting the Submission of Project Proposals


The FreeBSD Foundation is soliciting the submission of project
proposals for funded development grants. Proposals may be related to
any of the major subsystems or infrastructure within the FreeBSD
operating system, and will be evaluated based on desirability,
technical merit, and cost-effectiveness.

Key dates for this proposal solicitation:

Call for proposals: 27th March 2013
Deadline for submissions: 26th April 2013
Notifcation of accepted proposals: 17th May 2013

Proposals must include the following:

* A detailed description of what is being proposed, how it will
benefit the FreeBSD Project, and why the work is needed.
* A timeline and costing for the project.
* One or more people that will act as technical reviewers for the work.

Proposals are open to all developers, including non-FreeBSD
committers, but developers without access to commit to the source tree
must provide details about how the completion guidelines will be
achieved.

For details on the proposal submission process see
http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/documents/Project%20Proposal%20Procedures%202013.shtml

FreeBSD and Xorg on ARM

As part of the port of FreeBSD to the Efika Platform Project Xorg is now running on FreeBSD on ARM. Here's an update from the developer, Aleksandr Rybalko:
You've already seen or at least heard about ARM systems running FreeBSD. In most cases its routers, firewalls, network storage, etc. Why doesn't anyone use FreeBSD on an ARM based desktop or laptop It is because no one had implemented Xorg support for boards supported by FreeBSD. Now you have away to do just that!

I'm glad to introduce an Xorg driver for ARM, and not only ARM but for syscons framebuffer devices.It's called xf86-video-scfb.  The driver is very simple, and has been tested and works on the Efika MX and Raspberry Pi devices.  I hope it will work with other devices, including those not based on ARM.

Here are the instructions so you can get this running on your own system:  Building Xorg for FreeBSD ARM.

Porting FreeBSD to Efika Platforms Project Completed

We are pleased to announce the Porting FreeBSD to the Genesi Efika MX SmartBook laptop and SmartTop nettop devices projects has completed! While many FreeBSD developers are working on ARM on embedded systems we feel it's important to show FreeBSD running on ARM devices that people can easily touch and interact with. The port of FreeBSD to the Genesi Efika platforms makes that possible. It has also made possible Xorg running on many other ARM devices, including the Raspberry Pi.

Here is a set of directions for getting FreeBSD running on one of these incredibly inexpensive, and light weight, laptops for yourself: http://raybsd.blogspot.com/2013/02/easy-way-to-do-it-try-freebsd-on-efika.html

Faces of FreeBSD – Thomas Abthorpe


Faces of FreeBSD
Are you aware of the tangible benefits derived from our support of the FreeBSD community? In conjunction with our fundraising efforts, we are spotlighting different people on our website and Facebook page who have received funding to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, and advocate for FreeBSD.
Please enjoy our third installment of our Faces of FreeBSD series!


Let us introduce you to Thomas Abthorpe. We helped him attend BSDCan 2009, 2011, and 2012 by helping with his travel expenses. Here’s his story.

Thomas' Story


My name is Thomas Abthorpe, and I am a Server Administrator working for the Canadian Government during the day. In my spare time I volunteer with a grassroots movement called Bicycles for Humanity and doing various odd jobs within the FreeBSD Project.  I became a Ports committer in August 2007, doing my own thing for a while, mostly keeping to myself, until I joined the Donations Team. 

The Donations Team was my first real non-ports function within the FreeBSD Project.  From there my functions evolved.  I was invited to take over as portmgr-secretary@ in March of 2010.  One year later my membership was upgraded to full voting member on portmgr@.  I was voted by my peers within the FreeBSD Project to join core@this past July.

In my five active years within FreeBSD, I was fortunate enough to be sponsored by The FreeBSD Foundation to attend BSDCan 2009, 2011, and 2012. At these conferences I met developers from around the world, attended DevSummits and advanced my knowledge of FreeBSD in general by attending the talks. 

The conference format lends itself well to learning, socializing and camaraderie. I attended my first conference just to learn the process and take in the experience.  At the next two conferences, I was not only there as a participant, but also to also represent portmgr@.

I have said time and time again that I am purely a hobbyist in FreeBSDBecause of the generosity of The FreeBSD Foundation, I have been able to meet with other like-minded people and do my part to share my knowledge and friendship.

Thomas Abthorpe

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/