Category Archives: asiabsdcon

AsiaBSDCon 2013 Videos Posted to YouTube

Sato-san has created a playlist of 15 videos from AsiaBSDCon 2013. Congrats to the organizers for running another successful conference in Tokyo. Some of the FreeBSD-related videos are listed below:

There were also quite a few OpenBSD talks this year. I had a great time at AsiaBSDCon several years back and hope to make it back again some day.

Accepting Travel Grant Applications for AsiaBSDCon 2011

Calling all FreeBSD developers needing assistance with travel expenses to AsiaBSDCon 2011.

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please download, fill out and submit the Travel Grant Request Application by February 11, 2011 to apply for this grant.

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates.

You request funding based on a realistic and economical estimate of travel costs, accommodations, and registration or tutorial fees. If there are other sponsors willing to cover costs, such as your employer or the conference, we prefer you talk to them first, as our budget is limited. We are happy to split costs with you or another sponsor, such as just covering airfare or board.

If you are a speaker at the conference, we expect the conference to cover your travel costs, and will most likely not approve your direct request to us.

We review your application and if approved, authorize you to seek reimbursement up to a limit. We consider several factors, including our overall and per-event budgets, and (quite importantly) the benefit to the community by funding your travel.

Most rejected applications are rejected because of an over-all limit on travel budget for the event or year, due to unrealistic or uneconomical costing, or because there is an unclear or unconvincing argument that funding the applicant will directly benefit the FreeBSD Project. Please take these points into consideration when writing your application.

We reimburse costs based on receipts, and by check or bank transfer. And, we do not cover your costs if you end up having to cancel your trip. We require you to submit a report on your trip, which we may show to current or potential sponsors, and may include in our semi-annual newsletter.

There's some flexibility in the mechanism, so talk to us if something about the model doesn't quite work for you or if you have any questions. The travel grant program is one of the most effective ways we can spend money to help support the FreeBSD Project, as it helps developers get together in the same place at the same time, and helps advertise and advocate FreeBSD in the larger community.

Accepting Travel Grant Applications for AsiaBSDCon 2011

Calling all FreeBSD developers needing assistance with travel expenses to AsiaBSDCon 2011.

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please download, fill out and submit the Travel Grant Request Application by February 11, 2011 to apply for this grant.

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates.

You request funding based on a realistic and economical estimate of travel costs, accommodations, and registration or tutorial fees. If there are other sponsors willing to cover costs, such as your employer or the conference, we prefer you talk to them first, as our budget is limited. We are happy to split costs with you or another sponsor, such as just covering airfare or board.

If you are a speaker at the conference, we expect the conference to cover your travel costs, and will most likely not approve your direct request to us.

We review your application and if approved, authorize you to seek reimbursement up to a limit. We consider several factors, including our overall and per-event budgets, and (quite importantly) the benefit to the community by funding your travel.

Most rejected applications are rejected because of an over-all limit on travel budget for the event or year, due to unrealistic or uneconomical costing, or because there is an unclear or unconvincing argument that funding the applicant will directly benefit the FreeBSD Project. Please take these points into consideration when writing your application.

We reimburse costs based on receipts, and by check or bank transfer. And, we do not cover your costs if you end up having to cancel your trip. We require you to submit a report on your trip, which we may show to current or potential sponsors, and may include in our semi-annual newsletter.

There's some flexibility in the mechanism, so talk to us if something about the model doesn't quite work for you or if you have any questions. The travel grant program is one of the most effective ways we can spend money to help support the FreeBSD Project, as it helps developers get together in the same place at the same time, and helps advertise and advocate FreeBSD in the larger community.

AsiaBSDCon 2010 Videos

The videos from AsiaBSDCon 2010 are now available on the BSD Conferences YouTube channel. The full list of 17 AsiaBSDCon videos includes:Thanks Hiroki Sato and the other organizers of AsiaBSDCon for running a successful conference and uploading these videos. Some of these videos were previously available on ustream but are not currently accessible there. The YouTube channel provides automatic machine generated captions in ~50 languages, fast streaming, and a total of over 90 videos from conferences over the past ~3 years.

AsiaBSDCon 2010 Videos

The videos from AsiaBSDCon 2010 are now available on the BSD Conferences YouTube channel. The full list of 17 AsiaBSDCon videos includes:



Thanks Hiroki Sato and the other organizers of AsiaBSDCon for running a successful conference and uploading these videos. Some of these videos were previously available on ustream but are not currently accessible there. The YouTube channel provides automatic machine generated captions in ~50 languages, fast streaming, and a total of over 90 videos from conferences over the past ~3 years.

Accepting Travel Grant Applications for AsiaBSDCon 2010

Calling all FreeBSD developers needing assistance with travel expenses to AsiaBSDCon 2010.

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please fill out and submit the Travel Grant Request Application by January 29, 2010 to apply for this grant.

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates.

(1) You request funding based on a realistic and economical estimate of travel costs (economy airfare, trainfare, ...), accommodations (conference hotel and sharing a room), and registration or tutorial fees. If there are other sponsors willing to cover costs, such as your employer or the conference, we prefer you talk to them first, as our budget is limited. We are happy to split costs with you or another sponsor, such as just covering airfare or board.

If you are a speaker at the conference, we expect the conference to cover your travel costs, and will most likely not approve your direct request to us.

(2) We review your application and if approved, authorize you to seek reimbursement up to a limit. We consider several factors, including our overall and per-event budgets, and (quite importantly) the benefit to the community by funding your travel.

Most rejected applications are rejected because of an over-all limit on travel budget for the event or year, due to unrealistic or uneconomical costing, or because there is an unclear or unconvincing argument that funding the applicant will directly benefit the FreeBSD Project. Please take these points into consideration when writing your application.

(3) We reimburse costs based on actuals (receipts), and by check or bank transfer. And, we do not cover your costs if you end up having to cancel your trip. We require you to submit a report on your trip, which we may show to current or potential sponsors, and may include in our semi-annual newsletter.

There's some flexibility in the mechanism, so talk to us if something about the model doesn't quite work for you or if you have any questions. The travel grant program is one of the most effective ways we can spend money to help support the FreeBSD Project, as it helps developers get together in the same place at the same time, and helps advertise and advocate FreeBSD in the larger community.

AsiaBSDCon 2009

I just presented a paper at AsiaBSDCon 2009 on the FreeBSD/mips status. There's a lot going on with the FreeBSD/mips project these days. You can find out most of the details from my paper, which is available in letter or a4 format.In summary, there's a number of new ports underway. There's Cavium Octeon, Atheros 7xxx/9xxxx, RMI Au1xxxx and a couple others.AsiaBSDCon is always fun. There's many Japanese developers that don't get a chance to go to other conferences who I only get to see in Japan. This conference allows me to see them, as well as talk to them to see what they are using BSD in general, and FreeBSD specifically. The Japanese have often lead the way in many areas, and seeing their current projects is very interesting.Also, I could cut and paste large parts of my paper here, but I'm not sure of the value of doing that. Can people that have strong opinions leave feedback on this issue.

AsiaBSDCon 2009

I just presented a paper at AsiaBSDCon 2009 on the FreeBSD/mips status. There's a lot going on with the FreeBSD/mips project these days. You can find out most of the details from my paper, which is available in letter or a4 format.

In summary, there's a number of new ports underway. There's Cavium Octeon, Atheros 7xxx/9xxxx, RMI Au1xxxx and a couple others.

AsiaBSDCon is always fun. There's many Japanese developers that don't get a chance to go to other conferences who I only get to see in Japan. This conference allows me to see them, as well as talk to them to see what they are using BSD in general, and FreeBSD specifically. The Japanese have often lead the way in many areas, and seeing their current projects is very interesting.

Also, I could cut and paste large parts of my paper here, but I'm not sure of the value of doing that. Can people that have strong opinions leave feedback on this issue.