Category Archives: IPv6

World IPv6 Day – How to run 6to4 on FreeBSD

As you know, or should know, today (or tomorrow, depending on the timezone) is World IPv6 Day. What this means in practice is that a lot of top-tier IT businesses will make their web sites available via both IPv6 and IPv4, at least for a day. If you want to join in testing but your ISP is following the rest of the herd and isn't doing anything with IPv6, you can use various methods to tunnel your IPv6 traffic over IPv4.

Read more...

World IPv6 Day – How to run 6to4 on FreeBSD

As you know, or should know, today (or tomorrow, depending on the timezone) is World IPv6 Day. What this means in practice is that a lot of top-tier IT businesses will make their web sites available via both IPv6 and IPv4, at least for a day. If you want to join in testing but your ISP is following the rest of the herd and isn't doing anything with IPv6, you can use various methods to tunnel your IPv6 traffic over IPv4.

Read more...

FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems Announce IPv6-only Testing Versions of FreeBSD and PC-BSD

The Foundation is pleased to announce that Bjoern Zeeb has made good progress in the Improved IPv6 Support project and that testing snapshots for both FreeBSD and PC-BSD are now available in time for World IPv6 Day. From the press release:

The FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems announced today their commitment to support the efforts of World IPv6 Day to accelerate global IPv6 deployment. Earlier this year, the FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems jointly awarded Bjoern Zeeb a grant to create an IPv6-only version of the FreeBSD and PC-BSD open source operating systems.

FreeBSD is well-known as a network stack research and reference platform and its KAME-based reference implementation appeared over a decade ago. With the help of the community, FreeBSD has been serving releases from IPv6 enabled servers for more than 8 years and FreeBSD's website, mailing lists, and developer infrastructure have been IPv6 enabled since 2007. FreeBSD is used by critical Internet infrastructure such as root name servers, routers, firewalls and some of the world's busiest and most reliable web sites. PC-BSD is a complete desktop operating system, based on FreeBSD, having the casual computer user in mind.

Bjoern Zeeb explains the work as follows: "Similar to many modern operating systems, IPv6 in FreeBSD was an optional feature that implied IPv4 support. Since most "IPv6-ready" applications rely on dual-stack behavior, broken IPv6 support often goes unnoticed given the IPv4 fallback option. Providing an implementation of an IPv6-only kernel without IPv4 support provides the FreeBSD Project with the ability to test and fix such regressions while encouraging other software developers to improve their code for true IPv6 readiness. With PC-BSD serving the desktop community and FreeBSD targeting the server, infrastructure and embedded markets, we have created an ideal development and test platform for other open source and proprietary IPv6-aware application software."

Kris Moore, founder and lead developer of the PC-BSD Project notes that "PC-BSD, with its FreeBSD base, makes an ideal platform for the testing of end-user desktop applications and utilities in an IPv6 environment. We are proud to be able to offer an IPv6 desktop testing environment for World IPv6 Day."

FreeBSD testing snapshots are available here and PC-BSD testing snapshots are available here.

FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems Announce IPv6-only Testing Versions of FreeBSD and PC-BSD

The Foundation is pleased to announce that Bjoern Zeeb has made good progress in the Improved IPv6 Support project and that testing snapshots for both FreeBSD and PC-BSD are now available in time for World IPv6 Day. From the press release:

The FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems announced today their commitment to support the efforts of World IPv6 Day to accelerate global IPv6 deployment. Earlier this year, the FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems jointly awarded Bjoern Zeeb a grant to create an IPv6-only version of the FreeBSD and PC-BSD open source operating systems.

FreeBSD is well-known as a network stack research and reference platform and its KAME-based reference implementation appeared over a decade ago. With the help of the community, FreeBSD has been serving releases from IPv6 enabled servers for more than 8 years and FreeBSD's website, mailing lists, and developer infrastructure have been IPv6 enabled since 2007. FreeBSD is used by critical Internet infrastructure such as root name servers, routers, firewalls and some of the world's busiest and most reliable web sites. PC-BSD is a complete desktop operating system, based on FreeBSD, having the casual computer user in mind.

Bjoern Zeeb explains the work as follows: "Similar to many modern operating systems, IPv6 in FreeBSD was an optional feature that implied IPv4 support. Since most "IPv6-ready" applications rely on dual-stack behavior, broken IPv6 support often goes unnoticed given the IPv4 fallback option. Providing an implementation of an IPv6-only kernel without IPv4 support provides the FreeBSD Project with the ability to test and fix such regressions while encouraging other software developers to improve their code for true IPv6 readiness. With PC-BSD serving the desktop community and FreeBSD targeting the server, infrastructure and embedded markets, we have created an ideal development and test platform for other open source and proprietary IPv6-aware application software."

Kris Moore, founder and lead developer of the PC-BSD Project notes that "PC-BSD, with its FreeBSD base, makes an ideal platform for the testing of end-user desktop applications and utilities in an IPv6 environment. We are proud to be able to offer an IPv6 desktop testing environment for World IPv6 Day."

FreeBSD testing snapshots are available here and PC-BSD testing snapshots are available here.

New Funded Project: Improved IPv6 Support

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce that it has awarded Bjoern Zeeb a grant to improve the maturity of IPv6 support in FreeBSD and PC-BSD. This project is jointly sponsored with iXsystems.

FreeBSD's KAME-based reference implementation of IPv6 first appeared in FreeBSD 4.0, and can be found in a broad range of FreeBSD-derived commercial products. To date, IPv6 has been an optionally configured feature present in the default FreeBSD kernel; however, IPv6 configuration has implied configuration of IPv4. With much "IPv6-ready" application software relying on dual-stack behavior, broken IPv6 applications go unnoticed. Adding support for an IPv6 kernel without IPv4 will make FreeBSD and PC-BSD an ideal test and development platform for both open source and proprietary IPv6-aware application software.

"Narrowing down the code base to not rely on legacy IP will help us to identify OS and application components requiring improvement to work well in an IPv6 environment. This project will help to ensure a bright IPv6 future, as FreeBSD is used throughout the Internet: root name servers, storage appliances, routers, firewalls, TVs, desktop and mobile systems, and many of the world's busiest web sites," said Mr. Zeeb. FreeBSD Foundation director and FreeBSD core team member Robert Watson described the project as critical to the future of FreeBSD, "Bjoern's work will not only improve the maturity of our IPv6 implementation, but also motivate improvement of applications used in million of deployed FreeBSD and FreeBSD-derived systems." The project will also improve the quality and performance of FreeBSD's IPv6 stack.

Bjoern Zeeb is a consultant based in Germany and has been an active FreeBSD committer since 2004. He is currently also a member of the FreeBSD Security and Release Engineering teams, and was recently awarded the Itojun Service Award for his work on IPv6 in FreeBSD.

New Funded Project: Improved IPv6 Support

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce that it has awarded Bjoern Zeeb a grant to improve the maturity of IPv6 support in FreeBSD and PC-BSD. This project is jointly sponsored with iXsystems.

FreeBSD's KAME-based reference implementation of IPv6 first appeared in FreeBSD 4.0, and can be found in a broad range of FreeBSD-derived commercial products. To date, IPv6 has been an optionally configured feature present in the default FreeBSD kernel; however, IPv6 configuration has implied configuration of IPv4. With much "IPv6-ready" application software relying on dual-stack behavior, broken IPv6 applications go unnoticed. Adding support for an IPv6 kernel without IPv4 will make FreeBSD and PC-BSD an ideal test and development platform for both open source and proprietary IPv6-aware application software.

"Narrowing down the code base to not rely on legacy IP will help us to identify OS and application components requiring improvement to work well in an IPv6 environment. This project will help to ensure a bright IPv6 future, as FreeBSD is used throughout the Internet: root name servers, storage appliances, routers, firewalls, TVs, desktop and mobile systems, and many of the world's busiest web sites," said Mr. Zeeb. FreeBSD Foundation director and FreeBSD core team member Robert Watson described the project as critical to the future of FreeBSD, "Bjoern's work will not only improve the maturity of our IPv6 implementation, but also motivate improvement of applications used in million of deployed FreeBSD and FreeBSD-derived systems." The project will also improve the quality and performance of FreeBSD's IPv6 stack.

Bjoern Zeeb is a consultant based in Germany and has been an active FreeBSD committer since 2004. He is currently also a member of the FreeBSD Security and Release Engineering teams, and was recently awarded the Itojun Service Award for his work on IPv6 in FreeBSD.

Bjoern Zeeb Awarded International Itojun Service Award

FreeBSD developer Bjoern Zeeb, who recently completed the FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization Project, has been awarded the Itojun Service Award. From the press release:

The second Itojun Service Award was presented today at this week’s Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) meeting in Beijing, China. Bjoern A. Zeeb received the award for his dedicated work to make significant improvements in open source implementations of IPv6. IPv6 is the next generation of Internet protocol that will help ensure the continued rapid growth of the Internet as a platform for innovation.

First awarded last year, the Itojun Service Award honours the memory of Dr. Jun-ichiro “itojun

All internal services migrated to IPv6

In the last days I migrated all my internal services to IPv6.

All my jails have an IPv4 and an IPv6 address now. All Apaches (I have one for my picture gallery, one for webmail, and one for internal management) now listen on the internal IPv6 address too. Squid is updated from 2.x to 3.1 (the most recent version in the Ports Collection) and I added some IPv6 ACLs. The internal Postfix is configured to handle IPv6 too (it is delivering everything via an authenticated and encrypted channel to a machine with a static IPv4 address for final delivery). My MySQL does not need an IPv6 address, as it is only listening to requests via IPC (the socket is hardlinked between jails). All ssh daemons are configured to listen to IPv6 too. The IMAP and CUPS server was picking the new IPv6 addresses automatically. I also updated Samba to handle IPv6, but due to lack of a Windows machine which prefers IPv6 over IPv4 for CIFS access (at least I think my Windows XP netbook only tries IPv4 connections) I can not really test this.

Only my Wii is a little bit behind, and I have not checked if my Sony-TV will DTRT (but for this I first have to get some time to have a look if I have to update my DD-WRT firmware on the little WLAN-router which is “extending the cable

IPv6 in my LAN

After enabling IPv6 in my WLAN router, I also enabled IPv6 in my FreeBSD systems. I have to tell that the IPv6 chapter in the FreeBSD handbook does not contain as much information as I would like to have about this.

Configuring the interfaces of my two 9-current systems to also carry a specific IPv6 address (an easy one from the ULA I use) was easy after reading the man-page for rc.conf. After a little bit of experimenting it came down to:

ifconfig_rl0_ipv6=“inet6 ::2:1 prefixlen 64 accept_rtadv“
ipv6_defaultrouter=

The FreeBSD IPv6 Wiki

A month or so before EuroBSDCon 2007 conference the FreeBSD.org systems at Yahoo! had gotten IPv6 connectivity with the main web server and mail servers being accessible via IPv6. The FreeBSD wiki was still IPv4 only as was (and still is) is running in a jail.

At the conference I talked to Bjoern A. Zeeb (AKA bz@) about the issue with IPv4 only jails and he was interested in making a patch so FreeBSD jails could support IPv6 and the FreeBSD wiki could be accessible via IPv6.

I should poke Bjoern regularly about making the patch, which I failed miserably at, but he got work done on the patch anyway. A few weeks ago he sent me the IPv6 jail patch for me to try out. Since life should be interesting I didn’t try it on a test server, but on the production web server sky which hosts the FreeBSD wiki and more. Just in case there were any problems I made sure I was around to recover things in case the system blew up, but none of that happened. In fact, since I installed the patch on sky a week ago there haven’t been any problems (that I know of at least). Granted there aren’t much IPv6 traffic, but the IPv4 part have been under its normal load.

So far the main FreeBSD.org DNS record for the wiki has not been updated to include the AAAA records, so people will use IPv6 if they have it, but that expected to come soon. For now people can try out the wiki using IPv6 by accessing http://v6.wiki.nitro.dk/. It has a slight (100%) likeness with the IPv4 wiki, but… IPv6!

For people interested in the patch the work is being done in the FreeBSD Perforce repository at //depot/user/bz/jail/…. I am sure Bjoern will post appropriate public patch when he think it is ready. Credit should also go to Pawel Jakub Dawidek (AKA pjd@) who made the multi IP(v4) jail patch which Bjoern based his patch on. Thanks to Bjoern and Pawel for the work making this possible!

Now I just need to actually get around to setting up IPv6 at home, so I can actually try out the IPv6 wiki myself in anything other than lynx from other hosts… any year now.