Category Archives: OpenBSD

AsiaBSDCon 2014 Videos Posted (6 years of BSDConferences on YouTube)

Sato-san has once created a playlist of videos from AsiaBSDCon. There were 20 videos from the conference held March 15-16, 2014 and papers can be found here. Congrats to the organizers for running another successful conference in Tokyo. A full list of videos is included below. Six years ago when I first created this channel videos longer than 10 minutes couldn't normally be uploaded to YouTube and we had to create a special partner channel for the content. It is great to see how the availability of technical video content about FreeBSD has grown in the last six years.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries?list=PLnTFqpZk5ebAUvwU75KRZ7zwU5YUaPudL&w=560&h=315]

AsiaBSDCon 2013 Videos Posted to YouTube

Sato-san has created a playlist of 15 videos from AsiaBSDCon 2013. Congrats to the organizers for running another successful conference in Tokyo. Some of the FreeBSD-related videos are listed below:

There were also quite a few OpenBSD talks this year. I had a great time at AsiaBSDCon several years back and hope to make it back again some day.

New release: ELF Toolchain v0.6.1

I am pleased to announce the availability of version 0.6.1 of the software being developed by the ElfToolChain project.

This new release supports additional operating systems (DragonFly BSD, Minix and OpenBSD), in addition to many bug fixes and documentation improvements.

This release also marks the start of a new "stable" branch, for the convenience of downstream projects interested in using our code.

Comments welcome.

I know this is old..

From if_wi.c in FreeBSD:

/*
* Lucent WaveLAN/IEEE 802.11 PCMCIA driver.
*
* Original FreeBSD driver written by Bill Paul <[email protected]>
* Electrical Engineering Department
* Columbia University, New York City
*/

From if_wi.c in OpenBSD:

/*
* Lucent WaveLAN/IEEE 802.11 driver for OpenBSD.
*
* Originally written by Bill Paul <[email protected]>
* Electrical Engineering Department
* Columbia University, New York City
*/

RFC: OpenSMTPD for FreeBSD

I don’t like writing long posts so let’s go straight to the point. Here is a shar to test mail/opensmtpd on FreeBSD. Read the comments in the Makefile. Also this is just a preview. The port isn’t complete (I haven’t checked the conflicts yet and it doesn’t update mailer.conf).

For sample configs, have a look there.

Comments/patches welcome.

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fts(3) or Avoiding to Reinvent the Wheel

One of the C programs I was working on this weekend had to find all files that satisfy a certain predicate and add them to a list of “pending work”. The first thing that comes to mind is probably a custom opendir(), readdir(), closedir() hack. This is probably ok when one only has these structures, but it also a bit cumbersome. There are various sorts of DIR and dirent structures and recursing down a large path requires manually keeping track of a lot of state.

A small program that uses opendir() and its friends to traverse a hierarchy of files and print their names may look like this:

% cat -n opendir-sample.c
     1  #include <sys/types.h>
     2
     3  #include <sys/stat.h>
     4
     5  #include <assert.h>
     6  #include <dirent.h>
     7  #include <limits.h>
     8  #include <stdio.h>
     9  #include <string.h>
    10
    11  static int      ptree(char *curpath, char * const path);
    12
    13  int
    14  main(int argc, char * const argv[])
    15  {
    16          int k;
    17          int rval;
    18
    19          for (rval = 0, k = 1; k < argc; k++)
    20                  if (ptree(NULL, argv[k]) != 0)
    21                          rval = 1;
    22          return rval;
    23  }
    24
    25  static int
    26  ptree(char *curpath, char * const path)
    27  {
    28          char ep[PATH_MAX];
    29          char p[PATH_MAX];
    30          DIR *dirp;
    31          struct dirent entry;
    32          struct dirent *endp;
    33          struct stat st;
    34
    35          if (curpath != NULL)
    36                  snprintf(ep, sizeof(ep), "%s/%s", curpath, path);
    37          else
    38                  snprintf(ep, sizeof(ep), "%s", path);
    39          if (stat(ep, &st) == -1)
    40                  return -1;
    41          if ((dirp = opendir(ep)) == NULL)
    42                  return -1;
    43          for (;;) {
    44                  endp = NULL;
    45                  if (readdir_r(dirp, &entry, &endp) == -1) {
    46                          closedir(dirp);
    47                          return -1;
    48                  }
    49                  if (endp == NULL)
    50                          break;
    51                  assert(endp == &entry);
    52                  if (strcmp(entry.d_name, ".") == 0 ||
    53                      strcmp(entry.d_name, "..") == 0)
    54                          continue;
    55                  if (curpath != NULL)
    56                          snprintf(ep, sizeof(ep), "%s/%s/%s", curpath,
    57                              path, entry.d_name);
    58                  else
    59                          snprintf(ep, sizeof(ep), "%s/%s", path,
    60                              entry.d_name);
    61                  if (stat(ep, &st) == -1) {
    62                          closedir(dirp);
    63                          return -1;
    64                  }
    65                  if (S_ISREG(st.st_mode) || S_ISDIR(st.st_mode)) {
    66                          printf("%c %s\n", S_ISDIR(st.st_mode) ? 'd' : 'f', ep);
    67                  }
    68                  if (S_ISDIR(st.st_mode) == 0)
    69                          continue;
    70                  if (curpath != NULL)
    71                          snprintf(p, sizeof(p), "%s/%s", curpath, path);
    72                  else
    73                          snprintf(p, sizeof(p), "%s", path);
    74                  snprintf(ep, sizeof(ep), "%s", entry.d_name);
    75                  ptree(p, ep);
    76          }
    77          closedir(dirp);
    78          return 0;
    79  }

With more than 80 lines, this looks a bit too complex for the simple task it does. It has to keep a lot of temporary state information around in the two ep[] and p[] buffers, and all the manual work of setting updating and maintaining this internal state is adding so much noise around the actual printf() statement at line 68 that it is almost too hard to understand what this particular bit of code is supposed to do.

The program still "works", in a way, so if you compile and run it, the expected results come up:

keramida@kobe:/home/keramida$ cc -O2 opendir-sample.c
keramida@kobe:/home/keramida$ ./a.out /tmp
d /tmp/.snap
d /tmp/.X11-unix
d /tmp/.XIM-unix
d /tmp/.ICE-unix
d /tmp/.font-unix
f /tmp/aprtdTjbX
f /tmp/aprEdWP4d
d /tmp/fam-gdm
f /tmp/.X0-lock
d /tmp/fam-keramida
d /tmp/.esd-1000
d /tmp/screens
d /tmp/screens/S-root
d /tmp/screens/S-keramida
d /tmp/emacs1000
f /tmp/a
f /tmp/b
f /tmp/kot
f /tmp/logsort
keramida@kobe:/home/keramida$ ./a.out /tmp /etc/defaults
d /tmp/.snap
d /tmp/.X11-unix
d /tmp/.XIM-unix
d /tmp/.ICE-unix
d /tmp/.font-unix
f /tmp/aprtdTjbX
f /tmp/aprEdWP4d
d /tmp/fam-gdm
f /tmp/.X0-lock
d /tmp/fam-keramida
d /tmp/.esd-1000
d /tmp/screens
d /tmp/screens/S-root
d /tmp/screens/S-keramida
d /tmp/emacs1000
f /tmp/a
f /tmp/b
f /tmp/kot
f /tmp/logsort
f /etc/defaults/rc.conf
f /etc/defaults/bluetooth.device.conf
f /etc/defaults/devfs.rules
f /etc/defaults/periodic.conf

But this program looks "ugly". Fortunately, the BSDs and Linux provide a more elegant interface for traversing file hierarchies: the fts(3) family of functions. A similar program that uses fts(3) to traverse the filesystem hierarchies rooted at the arguments of main() is:

% cat -n fts-sample.c
     1  #include <sys/types.h>
     2
     3  #include <sys/stat.h>
     4
     5  #include <err.h>
     6  #include <fts.h>
     7  #include <stdio.h>
     8
     9  static int      ptree(char * const argv[]);
    10
    11  int
    12  main(int argc, char * const argv[])
    13  {
    14          int rc;
    15
    16          if ((rc = ptree(argv + 1)) != 0)
    17                  rc = 1;
    18          return rc;
    19  }
    20
    21  static int
    22  ptree(char * const argv[])
    23  {
    24          FTS *ftsp;
    25          FTSENT *p, *chp;
    26          int fts_options = FTS_COMFOLLOW | FTS_LOGICAL | FTS_NOCHDIR;
    27          int rval = 0;
    28
    29          if ((ftsp = fts_open(argv, fts_options, NULL)) == NULL) {
    30                  warn("fts_open");
    31                  return -1;
    32          }
    33          /* Initialize ftsp with as many argv[] parts as possible. */
    34          chp = fts_children(ftsp, 0);
    35          if (chp == NULL) {
    36                  return 0;               /* no files to traverse */
    37          }
    38          while ((p = fts_read(ftsp)) != NULL) {
    39                  switch (p->fts_info) {
    40                  case FTS_D:
    41                          printf("d %s\n", p->fts_path);
    42                          break;
    43                  case FTS_F:
    44                          printf("f %s\n", p->fts_path);
    45                          break;
    46                  default:
    47                          break;
    48                  }
    49          }
    50          fts_close(ftsp);
    51          return 0;
    52  }

This version is not particularly smaller; it's only 34-35% smaller in LOC. It is, however, far more elegant and a lot easier to read:

  • By using a higher level interface, the program is shorter and easier to understand.
  • By using simpler constructs in the fts_read() loop, it very obvious what the program does for each file type (file vs. directory).
  • The FTS_COMFOLLOW flag sets up things for following symbolic links in one simple place (something entirely missing from the opendir version).
  • There are no obvious bugs about copying half of a pathname, or forgetting to recurse in some cases, or forgetting to print some directory because of a complex interaction between superfluous bits of code. Simpler is also less prone to bugs in this case.

So the next time you are about to build a filesystem traversal toolset from scratch, you can avoid all the pain (and bugs): use fts(3)! :-)


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