Category Archives: planet

Florent Thoumie

I’ve just finished the migration of WordPress-MU and ReviewBoard over to the new VM (hosted by Your.org). Let me know if you notice anything that’s broken.

Thanks to Kevin Day for creating the VM!

PS: If you can’t reach either of blogs.freebsdish.org or reviews.freebsdish.org, then the old CNAME haven’t expired yet (TTL was set to 8 hours). Try again later.

FreeBSD Blogs and Planet FreeBSD

First, I’d like to apologize for the extended downtime planet freebsd has suffered in the past three weeks. The server was back up a few days ago but the issues I’ve been experiencing since early december were still present. The load on the box was insanely high all the time for very little traffic.

I’ve finally managed to find what was causing it and it seems to be working properly again (as in, requesting the front page doesn’t take 30 seconds amymore). While I was at it, I upgraded WordPress-MU to the freshly released 2.9.1 (video embedding is now dead easy, there’s a integrated picture editor, ...).

Again, sorry for the inconvenience. Happy reading!

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Planet FreeBSDish update (again)

So, that WordPress plugin I mentioned previously has been working pretty well and I might replace Planet faster than I thought. Actually I might do that over the weekend.

A few users probably won’t be happy that the “complete” version is going away. I don’t have plans for it at the moment. If you think something else is missing, leave a comment.

If you’re meant to be listed on blogs.freebsdish.org but you’re not, then drop me an email or leave a comment and I’ll (re-)add you.
If you’re in the list but don’t put your posts in the FreeBSD category, then they won’t be aggregated.

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Another Planet FreeBSD in testing…

Alright, so I just found out about that FeedWordPress plugin for WordPress and I figured I would give it a spin. It seems to be doing everything I did with Planet, and has a few features (shared admin rights through wordpress accounts, mark new posts as pending instead of publishing them straight away) that could prove useful if I want to poke core@ about planet.freebsd.org once again.

Anyway, check it out.

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Planet FreeBSD and Feedburner

Following Murray’s suggestion to use feedburner to track Planet FreeBSD subscribers, I’ve created feeds and added badges to Planet FreeBSD frontpages. So far it still shows 0 subscribers but I’ve done the necessary tweaking to point the rss/atom feeds to the new one. I hope the readers will be smart enough to notice the rss to atom change. We’ll see how it works out.

I’ve also removed the rss10/opml/foaf feeds as they seem to be mostly requested by crawlers. If you’re using it and can give a reasonable reason why you can’t use atom, drop me an email.

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Follow FreeBSD on Twitter and send tweets from FreeBSD command line

It just came to my attention that Eric Anderson setup a FreeBSD feed on twitter. There you can find updates from the FreeBSD website, from the blogs aggregated at FreeBSD Planet, and other FreeBSD related RSS feeds published as 140 character tweets with tinyurl links to the full posts. I've been using twitter for a while now for two quite separate purposes. Primarily, I enjoy following people like Tim O'Reilly to get an endless stream of interesting tech links, ideas, and thoughts throughout the day. The updates are 140 characters or less and I only click through to those that I have time for so I find it less of a time sink than logging into my feedreader (Google Reader) and really digging into the news I'm interested in. I also find it quite useful for arranging social engagements. I use it as an SMS broadcast medium to make plans and arrange to meetup with friends for dinner, drinks, movies, or whatever after work. For the latter purpose Twitter works best in conjunction with a GPS-enabled smartphone and something like Loopt.Following Eric's lead I setup a couple of more specific FreeBSD related twitter accounts using Twitter Feed to automatically publish the updates from RSS. The first account freebsdannounce consists of all the RSS feeds from the main www.freebsd.org website (most of which I added almost exactly one year ago). The second account freebsdblogs consists of the FreeBSD Planet combined RSS feed. If you want everything subscribe to Eric's main FreeBSD feed, but if you want only a subset of that content subscribe to one of my two more specific feeds.Finally, I couldn't find a way to make simple updates to twitter from the base FreeBSD system command line so I created a patch for very basic HTTP POST support for fetch. Apply this patch, rebuild and reinstall libfetch(3) and fetch(1) and then you can update twitter from the command line (or send a simple POST request to other web services) with :
$ fetch -x status='Experimenting with Twitter API.' http://twitter.com/statuses/update.xml
fetch(1) will then prompt you for the HTTP authentication credentials of your twitter account.I'm not sure how useful other people find HTTP POST support in fetch. If you would find this useful let me know and maybe I'll clean up the patch above and send it out for review.

Follow FreeBSD on Twitter and send tweets from FreeBSD command line

It just came to my attention that Eric Anderson setup a FreeBSD feed on twitter. There you can find updates from the FreeBSD website, from the blogs aggregated at FreeBSD Planet, and other FreeBSD related RSS feeds published as 140 character tweets with tinyurl links to the full posts. I've been using twitter for a while now for two quite separate purposes. Primarily, I enjoy following people like Tim O'Reilly to get an endless stream of interesting tech links, ideas, and thoughts throughout the day. The updates are 140 characters or less and I only click through to those that I have time for so I find it less of a time sink than logging into my feedreader (Google Reader) and really digging into the news I'm interested in. I also find it quite useful for arranging social engagements. I use it as an SMS broadcast medium to make plans and arrange to meetup with friends for dinner, drinks, movies, or whatever after work. For the latter purpose Twitter works best in conjunction with a GPS-enabled smartphone and something like Loopt.

Following Eric's lead I setup a couple of more specific FreeBSD related twitter accounts using Twitter Feed to automatically publish the updates from RSS. The first account freebsdannounce consists of all the RSS feeds from the main www.freebsd.org website (most of which I added almost exactly one year ago). The second account freebsdblogs consists of the FreeBSD Planet combined RSS feed. If you want everything subscribe to Eric's main FreeBSD feed, but if you want only a subset of that content subscribe to one of my two more specific feeds.

Finally, I couldn't find a way to make simple updates to twitter from the base FreeBSD system command line so I created a patch for very basic HTTP POST support for fetch. Apply this patch, rebuild and reinstall libfetch(3) and fetch(1) and then you can update twitter from the command line (or send a simple POST request to other web services) with :

$ fetch -x status='Experimenting with Twitter API.' http://twitter.com/statuses/update.xml

fetch(1) will then prompt you for the HTTP authentication credentials of your twitter account.

I'm not sure how useful other people find HTTP POST support in fetch. If you would find this useful let me know and maybe I'll clean up the patch above and send it out for review.