Category Archives: portmgr

The ports tree is now stage only

The ports tree is now fully staged (only 2% has been left unstaged, marked as broken and will be removed from the ports tree if no PR to stage them are pending in bugzilla).

I would like to thank every committer and maintainers for their work on staging!
It allowed us to convert more than 23k packages to support stage in only 11 months!

Staging is a very important state, it allows us to right now be able to run quality testing scripts on the packages (which already allowed to fix tons of hidden problems) and it allows use to be able to build packages as a regular user!

It also opens the gates to new features that users have been requesting for many years:

  • flavors
  • multiple packages

Expect those features to happen in the near future.

pkg 1.3.0 out!

Hi all,

I’m very please to announce the release of pkg 1.3.0
This version is the result of almost 9 month of hard work

Here are the statistics for the version:
- 373 files changed, 66973 insertions(+), 38512 deletions(-)
- 29 different contributors

Please not that for the first time I’m not the main contributor, and I would
like to particularly thanks Vsevold Stakhov for all the hard work he has done to
allow us to get this release out. I would like also to give a special thanks to
Andrej Zverev for the tons of hours spending on testing and cleaning the bug
tracker!

So much has happened that it is hard to summarize so I’ll try to highlight the
major points:
- New solver, now pkg has a real SAT solver able to automatically handle
conflicts and dynamically discover them. (yes pkg set -o is deprecated now)
- pkg install now able to install local files as well and resolve their
dependencies from the remote repositories
- Lots of parts of the code has been sandboxed
- Lots of rework to improve portability
- Package installation process has been reworked to be safer and handle properly
the schg flags
- Important modification of the locking system for finer grain locks
- Massive usage of libucl
- Simplification of the API
- Lots of improvements on the UI to provide a better user experience.
- Lots of improvements in multi repository mode
- pkg audit code has been moved into the library
- pkg -o A=B that will overwrite configuration file from cli
- The ui now support long options
- The unicity of a package is not anymore origin
- Tons of bug fixes
- Tons of behaviours fixes
- Way more!

Thank you to all contributors:
Alberto Villa, Alexandre Perrin, Andrej Zverev, Antoine Brodin, Brad Davis,
Bryan Drewery, Dag-Erling Smørgrav, Dmitry Marakasov, Elvira Khabirova, Jamie
Landeg Jones, Jilles Tjoelker, John Marino, Julien Laffaye, Mathieu Arnold,
Matthew Seaman, Maximilian Gaß, Michael Gehring, Michael Gmelin, Nicolas Szalay,
Rodrigo Osorio, Roman Naumann, Rui Paulo, Sean Channel, Stanislav E. Putrya,
Vsevolod Stakhov, Xin Li, coctic

Regards,
Bapt on behalf of the pkg@

BSDCan 2014 – Ports and Packages WG

Baptiste Daroussin started the session with a status update on package building. All packages are now built with poudriere. The FreeBSD Foundation sponsored some large machines on which it takes around 16 hours to build a full tree. Each Wednesday at 01:00UTC the tree is snapshot and an incremental build is started for all supported released, the 2 stable branches (9 and 10) and quarterly branches for 9.x-RELEASE and 10.x-RELEASE. The catalogue is signed on a dedicated signing machine before upload. Packages can be downloaded from 4 mirrors (us-west, us-east, UK, and Russia) and feedback so far has been very positive.

He went on to note that ports people need better coordination with src people on ABI breakage. We currently only support i386 and amd64, with future plans for ARM and a MIPS variant. Distfiles are not currently mirrored (since fixed), and while it has seen no progress, it’s still a good idea to build a pkg of the ports tree itself.

pkg 1.3 will include a new solver, which will help 'pkg upgrade' understand that an old packages needs to be replaced with a newer one, with no more need for 'pkg set' and other chicanery. Cross building ports has been added to the ports tree, but is waiting for pkg-1.3. All the dangerous operations in pkg have now been sandboxed as well.

EOL for pkg_tools has been set for September 1st. An errata notice has gone out that adds a default pkg.conf and keys to all supported branches, and nagging delays have been added to ports.

Quarterly branches based on 3 month support cycle has been started on an evaluation basis. We’re still unsure about the manpower needed to maintain those. Every quarter a snapshot of the tree is created and only security fixed, build and runtime fixed, and upgrades to pkg are allowed to be committed to it. Using the MFH tag in a commit message will automatically send an approval request to portmgr and an mfh script on Tools/ makes it easy to do the merge.

Experience so far has been good, some minor issues to the insufficient testing. MFHs should only contain the above mentioned fixes; cleanups and other improvements should be done in separate commits only to HEAD. A policy needs to be written and announced about this. Do we want to automatically merge VuXML commits, or just remove VuXML from the branch and only use the one in HEAD?

A large number of new infrastructure changes have been introduces over the past few months, some of which require a huge migration of all ports. To speed these changes up, a new policy was set to allow some specific fixes to be committed without maintainer approval. Experience so far has been good, things actually are being fixed faster than before and not many maintainers have complained. There was agreement that the list of fixes allowed to be committed without explicit approval should be a specific whitelist published by portmgr, and not made too broad in scope.

Erwin Lansing quickly measured the temperature of the room on changing the default protocol for fetching distils from MASTER_SITE_BACKUP from ftp to http. Agreement all around and erwin committed the change.

Ben Kaduk gave an introduction and update on MIT’s Athena Environment with some food for thought. While currently not FreeBSD based, he would like to see it become so. Based on debian/ubuntu and rolled out on hundreds of machines, it now has it’s software split into about 150 different packages and metapackages.

Dag-Erling Smørgrav discussed changes to how dependencies are handled, especially splitting dependencies that are needed at install time (or staging time) and those needed at run time. This may break several things, but pkg-1.3 will come with better dependency tracking solving part of the problem.

Ed Maste presented the idea of “package transparency”, loosely based on Google’s Certificate Transparency. By logging certificate issuance to a log server, which can be publicly checked, domain owners can search for certificates issued for their domains, and notice when a certificate is issued without their authority. Can this model be extended to packages? Mostly useful for individually signed packages, while we currently only sign the catalogue. Can we do this with the current infrastructure?

Stacy Son gave an update on Qemu user mode, which is now working with Qemu 2.0.0. Both static and dynamic binaries are supported, though only a handful of system call are supported.

Baptiste introduced the idea of having pre-/post-install scripts be a library of services, like Casper, for common actions. This reduces the ability of maintainers to perform arbitrary actions and can be sandboxed easily. This would be a huge security improvement and could also enhance performance.

Cross building is coming along quite well and most of the tree should be able to be build by a simple 'make package'. Major blockers include perl and python.

Bryan Drewery talked about a design for a PortsCI system. The idea is that committer easily can schedule a build, be it an exp-run, reference, QAT, or other, either via a web interface or something similar to a pull request, which can fire off a build.

Steve Wills talked about using Jenkins for ports. The current system polls SVN for commits and batches several changes together for a build. It uses 8 bhyve VMs instances, but is slow. Sean Bruno commented that there are several package building clusters right now, can they be unified? Also how much hardware would be needed to speed up Jenkins? We could duse Jenkins as a fronted for the system Bryan just talked about. Also, it should be able to integrate with phabricator.

Erwin opened up the floor to talk about freebsd-version(1) once more. It was introduced as a mechanism to find out the version of user land currently running as uname -r only represents the kernel version, and would thus miss updates of the base system that do no touch the kernel. Unfortunately, freebsd-version(1) cannot really be used like this in all cases, it may work for freebsd-update, but not in general. No real solution was found this time either.

The session ended with a discussion about packaging the base system. It’s a target for FreeBSD 11, but lots of questions are still to be answered. What granularity to use? What should be packages into how many packages? How to handle options? Where do we put the metadata for this? How do upgrades work? How to replace shared libraries in multiuser mode? This part also included the quote of the day: “Our buildsystem is not a paragon of configurability, but a bunch of hacks that annoyed people the most.”

Thanks to all who participated in the working group, and thanks again to DK Hostmaster for sponsoring my trip to BSDCan this year, and see you at the Ports and Packages WG meet up at EuroBSDCon in Sofia in September.

FreeBSD Developer Summit – BSDCan 2014 – Ports and Packages WG

Baptiste Daroussin started the session with a status update on package building. All packages are now built with poudriere. The FreeBSD Foundation sponsored some large machines on which it takes around 16 hours to build a full tree. Each Wednesday at 01:00UTC the tree is snapshot and an incremental build is started for all supported released, the 2 stable branches (9 and 10) and quarterly branches for 9.x-RELEASE and 10.x-RELEASE. The catalogue is signed on a dedicated signing machine before upload. Packages can be downloaded from 4 mirrors (us-west, us-east, UK, and Russia) and feedback so far has been very positive.

He went on to note that ports people need better coordination with src people on ABI breakage. We currently only support i386 and amd64, with future plans for ARM and a MIPS variant. Distfiles are not currently mirrored (since fixed), and while it has seen no progress, it’s still a good idea to build a pkg of the ports tree itself.

pkg 1.3 will include a new solver, which will help 'pkg upgrade' understand that an old packages needs to be replaced with a newer one, with no more need for 'pkg set' and other chicanery. Cross building ports has been added to the ports tree, but is waiting for pkg-1.3. All the dangerous operations in pkg have now been sandboxed as well.

EOL for pkg_tools has been set for September 1st. An errata notice has gone out that adds a default pkg.conf and keys to all supported branches, and nagging delays have been added to ports.

Quarterly branches based on 3 month support cycle has been started on an evaluation basis. We’re still unsure about the manpower needed to maintain those. Every quarter a snapshot of the tree is created and only security fixed, build and runtime fixed, and upgrades to pkg are allowed to be committed to it. Using the MFH tag in a commit message will automatically send an approval request to portmgr and an mfh script on Tools/ makes it easy to do the merge.

Experience so far has been good, some minor issues to the insufficient testing. MFHs should only contain the above mentioned fixes; cleanups and other improvements should be done in separate commits only to HEAD. A policy needs to be written and announced about this. Do we want to automatically merge VuXML commits, or just remove VuXML from the branch and only use the one in HEAD?

A large number of new infrastructure changes have been introduces over the past few months, some of which require a huge migration of all ports. To speed these changes up, a new policy was set to allow some specific fixes to be committed without maintainer approval. Experience so far has been good, things actually are being fixed faster than before and not many maintainers have complained. There was agreement that the list of fixes allowed to be committed without explicit approval should be a specific whitelist published by portmgr, and not made too broad in scope.

Erwin Lansing quickly measured the temperature of the room on changing the default protocol for fetching distils from MASTER_SITE_BACKUP from ftp to http. Agreement all around and erwin committed the change.

Ben Kaduk gave an introduction and update on MIT’s Athena Environment with some food for thought. While currently not FreeBSD based, he would like to see it become so. Based on debian/ubuntu and rolled out on hundreds of machines, it now has it’s software split into about 150 different packages and metapackages.

Dag-Erling Smørgrav discussed changes to how dependencies are handled, especially splitting dependencies that are needed at install time (or staging time) and those needed at run time. This may break several things, but pkg-1.3 will come with better dependency tracking solving part of the problem.

Ed Maste presented the idea of “package transparency”, loosely based on Google’s Certificate Transparency. By logging certificate issuance to a log server, which can be publicly checked, domain owners can search for certificates issued for their domains, and notice when a certificate is issued without their authority. Can this model be extended to packages? Mostly useful for individually signed packages, while we currently only sign the catalogue. Can we do this with the current infrastructure?

Stacy Son gave an update on Qemu user mode, which is now working with Qemu 2.0.0. Both static and dynamic binaries are supported, though only a handful of system call are supported.

Baptiste introduced the idea of having pre-/post-install scripts be a library of services, like Casper, for common actions. This reduces the ability of maintainers to perform arbitrary actions and can be sandboxed easily. This would be a huge security improvement and could also enhance performance.

Cross building is coming along quite well and most of the tree should be able to be build by a simple 'make package'. Major blockers include perl and python.

Bryan Drewery talked about a design for a PortsCI system. The idea is that committer easily can schedule a build, be it an exp-run, reference, QAT, or other, either via a web interface or something similar to a pull request, which can fire off a build.

Steve Wills talked about using Jenkins for ports. The current system polls SVN for commits and batches several changes together for a build. It uses 8 bhyve VMs instances, but is slow. Sean Bruno commented that there are several package building clusters right now, can they be unified? Also how much hardware would be needed to speed up Jenkins? We could duse Jenkins as a fronted for the system Bryan just talked about. Also, it should be able to integrate with phabricator.

Erwin opened up the floor to talk about freebsd-version(1) once more. It was introduced as a mechanism to find out the version of user land currently running as uname -r only represents the kernel version, and would thus miss updates of the base system that do no touch the kernel. Unfortunately, freebsd-version(1) cannot really be used like this in all cases, it may work for freebsd-update, but not in general. No real solution was found this time either.

The session ended with a discussion about packaging the base system. It’s a target for FreeBSD 11, but lots of questions are still to be answered. What granularity to use? What should be packages into how many packages? How to handle options? Where do we put the metadata for this? How do upgrades work? How to replace shared libraries in multiuser mode? This part also included the quote of the day: “Our buildsystem is not a paragon of configurability, but a bunch of hacks that annoyed people the most.”

Thanks to all who participated in the working group, and thanks again to DK Hostmaster for sponsoring my trip to BSDCan this year, and see you at the Ports and Packages WG meet up at EuroBSDCon in Sofia in September.

2014Q3 Branched

The 2014Q3 branch has just been branched and the package builder has been
updated to use that branch. This means that the next update on the quarterly
packages will be on the 2014Q3 branch.

What happened during the last 3 months:
- 177 different committers have participated
- 9918 commits happened
- diffstat says: 23646 files changed, 554070 insertions(+), 577210 deletions(-)

What does that means for users:
- default Java is now 1.7
- massive conversion to stagedir (93% of the ports are now properly staged)
- massive improvement of the usage of libtool (which reduces a lot overlinking)
- new USES: mono, objc, drupal, gecko, cpe, gssapi, makeinfo
- new Keywords for plist: @sample, @shell
- LibreOffice has been updated to 4.2.5
- Firefox has been updated to 30.0
- Firefox-esr has been updated to 24.6
- Default postgresql has moved from 9.0 to 9.2
- nginx has been updated to 1.6.0
- Default lua is 5.2
- subversion has been split into multiple ports for each features
- On FreeBSD 9-STABLE and 10-STABLE the default xorg 1.12.4 (for default binary
packages it is still 1.7.7)
- Improved QA checking in the infrastructure
- Info files are handle correctly even if base has been built WITHOUT_INFO
- Ancient emacs version has been cleaned out

Getting to know your portmgr@ – Steve Wills

It is my pleasure to introduce Steve Wills, the newest member of the portmgr team. Steve has done a tremendous work on the ports tree, especially in the field of testing and quality. Here is a short interview to get to know him better.

Name
Steve Wills

Committer name
swills

Inspiration for your IRC nick
Boring, it’s my userid.

TLD of origin
.us

Current TLD (if different from above)
Same.

Occupation
Sysadmin.

When did you join portmgr@
2014

Blog
Used to have one, use twitter more now (@swills)

Inspiration for using FreeBSD
Simplicty and learning.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD
Can’t recall, it was ages ago.

Who was your mentor(s)
pgollucci

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD
Trying to migrate Ruby default version from 1.8 to 1.9 and having to roll back.

Boxers / Briefs / other
Heh, question assume survey taker is male, which I am, but I think we need to
work on diversity (but not in that “hey, let’s work on diversity and get some
women” way, but more in that we make something everyone wants to use)

What is your role in your circle of friends
The FreeBSD user. ;)

vi(m) / emacs / other
vi(m)

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD
New users, new committers.

Favourite musician/band
I listen to a decent variety of stuff, but I suppose the thing I come back to
most is NIN.

What book do you have on your bedside table
I have an iPad by my bed, which I bought to read, but mostly I browse news on
it.

coffee / tea / other
Don’t drink caffeine, so don’t drink coffee much. I do drink good beer tho.

Do you have a guilty pleasure
Good dark chocolate. :)

How would you describe yourself
Mostly standard in many ways, husband, father, FreeBSD hacker, sysadmin, in
that order.

sendmail / postfix / other
Sendmail, tho dma is nice too.

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD
Used to play guitar, still have one, don’t find time to pick it up much any
more.

What is your favourite TV show
Futurama

Claim to Fame
Ported Acidwarp from DOS to svgalib.

What did you have for breakfast today
Everything bagel with plain cream chese.

What sports team do you support
The only sport I watch is University of North Carolina Basketball.

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD
ruby ports, perl ports sometimes

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know
I was an employee at Red Hat way way back

Any parting words you want to share
Not really.

What is your .sig at the moment
Null.

Steve

Frederic Culot takes over as portmgr-secretary@

It is with great pleasure that the FreeBSD Ports Management Team announces that Frederic (culot@) Culot will take over responsibilities of team secretary effective immediately.

Frederic became a ports committer in October 2010, and joined the ranks of portmgr-lurkers@ in March 2014 as the shadow secretary.

Please drop him a note and congratulate him (or offer condolences).

 

Thomas
on behalf of portmgr@

 

Getting to know your portmgr-lurker — Frederic Culot

Name

Frederic Culot

Committer name

culot

Inspiration for your IRC nick

lack of inspiration actually…

TLD of origin

.fr

Current TLD (if different from above)

.lu

Occupation

IT consultant in the banking sector in Luxembourg, but I don’t always do IT.
I am also interested in business and management and my wife and I are working
on starting our own business.

When did you join portmgr@

Joined FreeBSD as a committer in October 2010 and the portmgr-lurkers program in
March 2014, but never been part of portmgr@.

Blog

http://people.freebsd.org/~culot is the closest thing I have to a blog

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

I was a longtime OpenBSD user until I worked in the same company as clement@
(former portmgr) who successfully managed to convert me to FreeBSD. I did not
feel the need to look into another system since then.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

clement@. But when I really started to get involved in FreeBSD it was jadawin@
who first contacted me. He is one of the kindest person I ever worked with and
while we’ve known each others for about 4 years now I’ve never been able to
meet him in person. But that’s the way it is with projects such as FreeBSD:
teams are virtual and gathering together might be difficult unfortunately.

Who was your mentor(s)

My mentors were sahil@ and wen@. Thanks to them I believe my mentorship at
FreeBSD was the best induction program I ever experienced. I was also amused to
realize that whereas companies spend huge amounts to design reward systems, it
is sometimes when nothing is to be expected in return that people are the most
caring and helpful.

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

My first pointy hat: a bit after my first 700 commits when I started to feel
confident I finally managed to break INDEX :’(

Boxers / Briefs / other

Any 15-year old single material does it.

What is your role in your circle of friends

uncork the bottles usually…

vi(m) / emacs / other

vim

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

The people behind it. There are lots of great guys behind this project, and a
day when I could not meet with other developers on irc is a sad day for me :’(

But FreeBSD is also one of my sources of inspiration when it comes to how
organizations behave and innovate (which is a topic of interest I got into
during my MBA studies) and I find it very interesting to compare FreeBSD with
the for-profit companies I work for. I even wrote an article for BSDmag in case
some would also be interested in those aspects:

http://people.freebsd.org/~culot/BSDmag.pdf

> Favourite musician/band

I don’t listen to much music. The cause might be that I work in a very noisy
environment (large open-space), so I more and more enjoy silence and calm when
I’m back home. But recently when I listen to music I enjoy Moby’s “wait for me”
album (ambient edition), Erik Mongrain, or a bit of merengue to remind me of my
holidays.

What book do you have on your bedside table

Nietzsche’s Thus spoke Zarathoustra.

I even extracted my favorite quotes and created the
french/fortune-mod-zarathoustra port.

coffee / tea / other

Both, depends on the time of day

Do you have a guilty pleasure

To enjoy a 7-course meal with my wife at a 3-star michelin restaurant and
finish relaxing in a club chair in front of the fireplace with a 40 years old
armagnac.

How would you describe yourself

Sober, clever, and motivated in the morning.
Drunk, stupid, and depressed in the evening.
Or is it the opposite?

sendmail / postfix / other

sendmail as it’s in base, but not for long apparently so I could have to make a
more reasoned choice soon

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

Sports (I go to the gym almost everyday day, did quite some scuba diving and
snowboarding when I was younger), but I enjoy good food and wine when I’m done
training. I also enjoy traveling. My last trips were to India, Dominican
Republic, and Lapland: so many nice places to visit!

What is your favourite TV show

My favorites to day are twin peaks, the prisoner, and battlestar galactica

Claim to Fame

I spent one night at the pub with bapt@, and survived.

What did you have for breakfast today

oat flakes with water

What sports team do you support

If you want to torture me, just fasten me in front of the TV with a soccer game
on. I could even confess I enjoy tabthorpe’s jokes just to shorten the ordeal.

<Editors note: I have know idea what he means by this :>

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

Apart from my work on ports I also did some French translations (translated
the contributing-ports, linux-users, and building-products articles). I also
try to participate in IT exhibits and promote FreeBSD by managing booths such
as at Solutions Linux Paris for which I designed a poster to attract visitors:

http://people.freebsd.org/~culot/SolutionsLinux.png

But most importantly I offer beers and whisky to other FreeBSD developers when
I meet them :)

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I actually enjoy tabthorpe’s jokes. Sometimes.

<Editor’s note: again, no clue what he is talking about :>

Any parting words you want to share

I repeat it but my main motivation to work on this project is to get in touch
with other FreeBSD enthusiasts, so do not hesitate to ping me on irc if you
feel like sharing some of your thoughts with me. I would be most pleased.

What is your .sig at the moment

Regards,
Frederic Culot

Getting to know your portmgr-lurker — Alexy Dokuchaev

In this latest edition of Getting to know, we interview senior ports committer Alexy Dokuchaev as one of our newest portmgr-lurkers.

Name

Alexey Dokuchaev

Committer name

danfe@

TLD of origin

.ru (technically should be .su, but it’s now defunct)

Occupation

Software engineer and contractor

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

Wanted a Unix system that I could understand and that would not get bloated
as time goes by. In 1998 Linux was popular mount local folks, but I just
could not get it (trying to switch from DOS). Someone mentioned FreeBSD;
and it all started to make sense pretty much immediately. And even after
some 15 years, FreeBSD still feels like back in those good days.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

Max Khon (fjoe@), I guess…

Who was your mentor(s)

fjoe@ and krion@

vi(m) / emacs / other

nvi(1)

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

That in 2014 I can have a modern Unix system which I still can work with
like it’s 1999 again. I can still have text console. And start X11 with
startx(1). Configure things by editing /etc/rc.conf, but have support for
the latest hardware. Play sound via OSS, yet enjoy low-latency in-kernel
mixer. We’re so lucky to not have Lennart Poettering with his PulseAudio
and systemd crap…

coffee / tea / other

Both (but tea preferred) + beer

What is your favourite TV show

The X Files, I guess…

What is your .sig at the moment

./danfe (making it both answer and a sig this time)

portmgr-lurkers@ March 1 edition

The first intake of portmgr-lurkers@ is complete, and it is now time to start with the second round of our -lurkers.  Please join us in welcoming Alexey (danfe@) Dokuchaev and Frédéric (culot@) Culot to our ranks.

During this -lurker round, culot@ will be the shadow portmgr-secretary@, learning the finer points of the roles and responsibilities of the job.

Thomas
on behalf of portmgr@

Time to bid farewell to the old pkg_ tools

There comes a time in the life cycle of just about every software package that it has bee re-evaluated, refreshed, deprecated or just retired.

It is time that we bid farewell to the old pkg_* software that has been part of FreeBSD since the beginning, and has served us well. After years of development, testing, and playing, pkg(8) has become a suitable replacement.

Pkg is the Next Generation package management tool for FreeBSD. It is the replacement for the current pkg_info/pkg_create/pkg_add tools that ports use to register local packages and which provide remote packages. Its main goals are to facilitate remote binary package upgrades. It also works with ports without remote binary packages.

Pkg, combined with the quarterly release package sets, enables easy installation and safe upgrades for binary packages. Signed, binary packages are available for all supported FreeBSD releases on the i386 and  amd64 platforms from pkg.freebsd.org. Additionally, for those compiling ports from source, pkg’s new database format gives more fine-grained querying and management of installed software.

New features on the drawing board, like automatic pkg-plist generation, sub-packages, creating multiple packages containing different parts of a port from one build process, and flavours, being able to ask for e.g. a webserver, without directly specifying a specific one, cannot be implemented in the old pkg_* tools and those plans are currently on hold.

You are not obligated to switch to binary packages, if you still prefer to compile your own ports, it is a simple matter of installing ports-mgmt/pkg, run pkg2ng, add WITH_PKGNG=yes to your make.conf and use pkg <action> instead of pkg_<action>.

You can read more about pkgng on the FreeBSD wiki, https://wiki.freebsd.org/pkgng.

The decision has been made to allow the old pkg_* software to be EoL’d 6 months from now, at September 1, 2014 in all active FreeBSD branches.

Please start testing pkg(8) in your test environments before taking it live, you will find the benefits of full binary updates for your ports to be beneficial in a very short amount of time. Even if you prefer to compile from source, you will still reap the benefits of the modern packaging system.

Ion-Mihai Tetcu steps down from duties on portmgr@

Ion-Mihai Tetcu, aka itetcu@, aka ionut, has stepped down from his duties on the FreeBSD Ports Management Team.

Ion-Mihai was the one who initially gave us Ports QAT, which gave almost immediate response to a problematic commit, then he enhanced with with other tests, such as installation of all ports to a non-standard DESTDIR. These combined efforts paved the way for cleaner commits to the ports tree.

On behalf of the Ports Management team, we would like to thank Ion-Mihai for his many years of service and dedication.
Thomas
on behalf of portmgr@

portmgr-lurkers@ promoted to voting members of portmgr@

The FreeBSD Ports Management team is pleased to announce that Mathieu Arnold (mat@) and Antoine Brodin (antoine@) have been promoted to full voting members of the team after a successful launch of the portmgr-lurkers pilot project.

Each of them brings new skills and vast experience to the team. Please join me in welcoming them aboard.
Thomas
on behalf of portmgr@

Joe Marcus Clarke steps down from duties on portmgr@

Joe Marcus Clarke, aka marcus@, has stepped down from his duties on the FreeBSD Ports Management Team.

Joe was our longest serving member of the team. Among his many accomplishments was being the repocopy source of authority, instrumental in championing tinderbox development and maintaining portlint.

On behalf of the Ports Management team, we would like to thank Joe for his many years of service and dedication.
Thomas
on behalf of portmgr@

Blanket approval to modernize the Ports Tree

In years gone by, and I am thinking of FreeBSD 7.0 specifically, portmgr@
gave some latitude to *ALL* committers to “just fix things” to get a port
into shape. In the case of 7.0, it was making ports build for gcc4.

What we have laying ahead of us is a ports tree in various states of modern
preparedness (new style USES=, stagefication, etc) and the old way of doing
ports (boo!).

We would like committers, and contributors to generate a PR and/or “just
fix” the old ports to update them to the new way of doing things regardless
of maintainership. We are looking for fixes in the following areas

- Convert to LIB_DEPENDS
- stagify ports
- convert things like USE_GMAKE -> USES=gmake USE_DOS2unix -> USES=dos2unix
etc

This can be done with implicit portmgr@ blanket approval, and without
maintainer approval.

Please, however, respect some boundaries, do not change ports belonging to
kde@, gnome@ or x11@. These teams work in private repos that may have
changes pending.

Also, cross reference GNATS, to see if a port has an open PR that you can
factor into the fix. It is important to stress here that we *DO NOT* want
to invalidate existing patches that a maintainer has offered up or already
approved.

If the change is very trivial AND has been tested, “just fix it”. One of
the strengths of the Ports Collection is it’s volunteer maintainers, if you
make a change, regardless of how trivial, just send a courtesy email to the
maintainer.

Getting to know your portmgr@ — Bryan Drewery

In this interview, we talk to the newest member of the team, Bryan Drewery.  Bryan first came to the attention of many by adopting portupgrade and friends, and then jumping into pkgng and poudriere.

Name

Bryan Drewery

Committer name

bdrewery

TLD of origin

.net

<Editor’s note: while Bryan claims to be a netizen, it is believed he is originally from .us :)>

Occupation

Software Engineer

When did you join portmgr@

March 2013. Joined FreeBSD as a committer in August 2012. As a contributor
in March 2012.

Blog

http://blog.shatow.net is my blog. I have not made much effort on it yet but
have a lot of ideas and content to add eventually.

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

It took a long time for me to discover FreeBSD. I wish I had 10 years
sooner. My first experience with a computer was with MS-DOS 5. Then I worked
up through Windows 3.1, 95, 98, XP. Somewhere around here I discovered Redhat
5 and shortly after Debian and Gentoo. In high school I took an AP CS class
that used FreeBSD 4, which was my first introduction to it. My first
introduction to ports was in the same class where not having root and wanting
to install an application I went into /usr/ports/irc/BitchX and tried to ‘make
install’ and failed of course. I still wish this worked. Shortly after that I
started doing work for a Shell Hosting company that used FreeBSD 4.10. At this
time I was still much more fond of Linux though. When I met my Wife, she was
also doing Shell Hosting with FreeBSD. That’s when I started doing actual
development on it and customizing the system. I found that with FreeBSD I
could customize the system far more than I could with any Linux distribution.
This is what sold me the most and led me away from Linux. Though I do still
use Linux for Xen dom0 and some development.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

Probably garga@ qmail patches I sent in years ago. Once I discovered pkgng
though it was bapt@. That’s what led me to becoming a committer. I actually
knew zi@ outside of FreeBSD too from when I was an EFNet oper.

Who was your mentor(s)

Baptiste Daroussin (bapt@) and Eitan Adler (eitan@)

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

Wiping systems of course. One of which was someone else’s system who ran my
bad code!

vi(m) / emacs / other

I was a longtime (6 years) pico/nano poweruser (haha) until I discovered vim
in my first real job.

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

I just like to write code. It’s hard for me to let go of things I put a lot
of effort into! I got into this with the intent to help get packaging working
for my own servers and to takeover ports that were abandoned that I felt were
critical for my servers.

Favorite musician/band

There’s so many. Lately I’ve been listening to metalcore and post-hardcore
bands. http://www.last.fm/user/bdrewery has all of the music I listen to.

What book do you have on your bedside table

Design and Implementation of FreeBSD, Kindle, C++ Standard Template Library
(C++11).

coffee / tea / other

I used to drink insane amounts of diet Mt. Dew. Not anymore though, no
caffeine for me.

Do you have a guilty pleasure

I get into games every now and then. Xbox 360, PS3, PC, Wii. I love Windows
7. I’ve been a Mac user for a few months now as well.

sendmail / postfix / other

qmail. My mail server is something that I setup years ago, hacked at quite a
bit with custom patches and never want to redo again.

What is your favorite TV show

Breaking Bad, Lost, The Wire, Dr. Who, Sons of Anarchy, Dexter.

What sports team do you support

I’m not really into rooting on sports teams. I enjoy playing much more than
watching.

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

I maintain upstream for portupgrade and poudriere, help with pkgng, qmail,
openssh-portable. I also am starting to work more in the src world. I maintain
portmaster but have not put much real effort into it. For portmgr I help test
Mk/ patches, I do exp-runs, help manage the package building systems, and fix
Mk/ bugs as I run across them.

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I was involved with the eggdrop IRC bot project and have been maintaining a
pretty popular fork of my own for the past 10 years.

Any parting words you want to share

Getting involved with Open Source is really easy. We’re all volunteers like
you. Just start helping. Send patches, bug reports, code, documentation,
translations, typo fixes. Everything helps.

What is your .sig at the moment

Regards,
Bryan Drewery

The Ports Management Team 2013-12-09 15:19:23

In this week’s interview, we talk to Baptiste Daroussin, who brought us such things as poudriere, pkgng, etc.

Name

Baptiste Daroussin

Committer name

bapt

Inspiration for your IRC nick

Baptiste is too long to type

TLD of origin

.fr

Occupation

Unix system engineer in general

When did you join portmgr@

May 2011

<Editor’s note: here is the video of bapt getting recruited, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZk__K8rqOg >

Blog

http://blog.etoilebsd.net

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

I started using FreeBSD as a student in 2001/2002 and never left it since

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

According to ports/86401 barner@ was

Who was your mentor(s)

In the ports land: jadawin@ and tabthorpe@
In the src land: des@

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

There are too much of them to be able just pick one like this.

Boxers / Briefs / other

Boxers

What is your role in your circle of friends

Depend on the circle

vi(m) / emacs / other

vim

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

FreeBSD is a fantastic Operatic System with a crappy package system
The ports needs lots of cleanup and modernization,
The package system still need lots of love.

Favourite musician/band

I like lots of different kind of music, if I have to choose just one band I
would say Metallica from before they mess up (I let fan decide themself when
they started to mess up)

What book do you have on your bedside table

The Restraint of Beasts by Magnus Mills

coffee / tea / other

coffee

Favourite whisky

Old Pultney

Do you have a guilty pleasure

Add french words to the FreeBSD user vocabulary

How would you describe yourself

Hey

sendmail / postfix / other

OpenSMTPD

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

I do play rugby on a regular basis, I love reading books (real books not
e-something), party with friends etc.

What is your favourite TV show

I do not watch much television

Claim to Fame

pkgng, poudrière, USES, new options framework for the ports tree, staging area
support for the ports tree, more to come :)

What did you have for breakfast today

Chocapics :)

What sports team do you support

I love practicing but I not particularly supporting any team.

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

I’m trying to lean pf code and see how complicated it is to sync features from
OpenBSD’s version (I said trying :))

I maintain some contrib code in base: mostly m4 and byacc

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I keep refraining myself from forking the ports tree into a portsng thing :)
(not sure most people don’t know that)

Any parting words you want to share

Any volunteer to document my work?

What is your .sig at the moment

regards,
Bapt

The Ports Management Team 2013-12-02 15:31:58

As port of the ongoing series on getting to know your portmgr@, I interview the portmgr-secretary@, Thomas Abthorpe.  (Yes it is awkward talking about myself in third person)

Name

Thomas Abthorpe

Committer name

tabthorpe

Inspiration for your IRC nick

Uninterestingly, just my uid that I have had in near continuous use since 1989

TLD of origin

CA

Occupation

Regional Technical Support Specialist with the Canadian Grain Commission

When did you join portmgr@

Joined as -secretary in March 2010
Upgraded to full member in March 2011

Blog

http://www.abthorpe.org

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

I wanted to run a webserver, and I wanted something free. I was going
to use something linux, then met up with a former prof from university,
and shared my story with him. He told me FreeBSD was the way to go.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

clsung, miwi, rafan

Who was your mentor(s)

clsung/miwi

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

I reset a bunch of ports that were name@??.FreeBSD.org, because my
script was only checking for @FreeBSD.org. I was called on it
privately, to which I immediately reverted my commit.

Boxers / Briefs / other

Boxers

What is your role in your circle of friends

Oddly enough, social convener

vi(m) / emacs / other

vim

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

I just love that I (and anybody for that matter) can contribute the most
trivial of things, and watch it go live.

Favourite musician/band

Favourite of all time is The Beatles. On the home front, I am huge fan
of the Canadian band Barenaked Ladies. I was so fortunate to even meet
them back stage at a concert in 1997.

What book do you have on your bedside table

The Beardmore Relics. It is a fictionalised story of hoax about
viking relics that were discovered near Beardmore, ON, a little
community I lived in back in the late 70s.

 coffee / tea / other

Coffee, intravenous if possible!

Favourite whisky

Springbank

Do you have a guilty pleasure

Sitting around in comfortable lounge wear, watching Sci-Fi on TV

How would you describe yourself

N-Space, multidimensional nerd.

sendmail / postfix / other

sendmail for internal use, postfix for anything exposed to the Internet

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

I am a senior apprentice bicycle mechanic with a grass roots movement
called Bicycles for Humanity

What is your favourite TV show

Big Bang Theory. Physics was my other interest I followed in
university. The interaction among the friends, is uncannily similar as
that among my friends. Fortunately we have no Sheldon. And Barenaked
Ladies do the theme song :)

Love almost anything Sci-Fi, particularly the old Stargate franchise(s), Dr. Who
Sanctuary, etc, etc, etc.

Claim to Fame

Don’t really think I have one

What did you have for breakfast today

Coffee and a bagel.  I have that almost everyday, so when I say to people,
“You expect me to remember BLAH? I don’t remember what I had for
breakfast yesterday?” there is an implied irony.

What sports team do you support

Pro hockey – The one and only Montreal Canadiens
Pro lacrosse – The Toronto Rock
University hockey – Lakehead University Thunderwloves

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

core@, donations@, formerly kde@

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I used to play the bagpipes. Was “fair” at it. My band was invited to
play at the “Toys on Parage” in Santa Ana CA back in 1987. Astronaut
Neil Armstrong was the parade marshall, and I can claim that I was at a
black tie reception with him. I was performing with the band, and I wasn’t
allowed to get near him, but I can at least say I “partied” with him.

Any parting words you want to share

Always remember the Golden Rule, “Do unto others, before others do unto you”,
or something like that :)

What is your .sig at the moment

Thomas Abthorpe | FreeBSD Committer
[email protected] | http://people.freebsd.org/~tabthorpe

The Ports Management Team 2013-11-25 15:38:23

In this interview, we talk to Martin Wilke, aka miwi, the high quality automated PR and commit bot.

Name

Martin Wilke

Committer name

miwi

Inspiration for your IRC nick

MartIn WIlke

TLD of origin

Ger

Current TLD (if different from above)

My

Occupation

System Administrator

When did you join portmgr@

Jun 4 08:35:57 UTC 2009 (actually a few hours earlier because we did
know that already)

Blog

http://miwi.cc (I did not write anything in ages ^^)

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

Can I use a shout cart?
http://miwi.cc/2012/03/why-freebsd-my-personal-view/ that should explain it
quite well I think.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

To be honest, I think many because I spam GNATS quiet heavily :)

Who was your mentor(s)

Krion (wave)

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

If you want to know, see my commit history, you will find a lot :(

Boxers / Briefs / other

Boxers

vi(m) / emacs / other

vi(m)/mcedit :)

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

Still the community

Favourite musician/band

Gerneral I still like and listen a lot to of German Hip Hop (I still feel
very young!)

What book do you have on your bedside table.

Book? Can I eat that?

coffee / tea / other

black coffee

Do you have a guilty pleasure

Hm..

How would you describe yourself

Shy :)

sendmail / postfix / other

postfix

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

When you have kids there is not much time left for hobbies :)

What is your favourite TV show

Stargate*, House

Claim to Fame

miwibot and friends ..

What did you have for breakfast today

Rotti Chanai, Ice Milo

What sports team do you support

I keep on following F1 and hope a other German Driver will win ..

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

Trying to clean up bapts stuff *gg* (joking), lately I helped a lot
on the cluster setup / package packaging.

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I canâ~@~Yt else you will know :)

<Editor note: this is a copy and paste, something may have been lost in translation>

Any parting words you want to share.

Have a nice day!

What is your .sig at the moment

Mess with the best, die like the rest :).