Category Archives: translations

PC-BSD Weekly Feature Digest 23

Hey PC-BSDers! This week we’re coming at you with some pretty sweet updates to PC-BSD. The mount tray has seen some significant improvement and is now able to mount most audio / dvd formats without a problem. Also windows partition types are now showing up correctly on my test system after building the new mount tray from source. The mount tray will also prompt you to open your disc with a program and will offer you correct suggestions based on the proper package / PBI. Ultimately the mount tray will most likely replace the built in mounting systems in the desktop environments. This is still a little ways off in the future, but the direction we are heading in.

We heard that there were some users that were experiencing problems upgrading and believe we have found the guilty party. I was able to duplicate the same package upgrade problem that was causing updates to 10.0.1 to fail, and asked Allan over at Scale Engine to give us a hand. Allan was able to track down the issue to a faulty distribution server that was interrupting connections and preventing the upgrades randomly. This server has been removed from service at this time and further work is going into preventing this from happening again in the future.

Work has begun to localize PC-BSD into the Hindi language. We’d like to give a shout out to the newest member of our translation team Simran. Thanks for your help and we are excited at the prospect for even more people to be able to use PC-BSD. Our estimated date of completion is 3 weeks from now. If you have an interest in this language please help us spread the word!

Other News / Projects for this week:

* Merged latest ports and gnome3 patches into ‘master’
* Merged in latest VirtualBox versions
* Wrote a userland replacement for the FUSE module to execute PBIs in a faster and less unstable manner (about 90% complete)
* Kicked off new –STABLE builds
* Update 9.x PBI’s
* Add new XDG-compatibility classes in libpcbsd (scanning/listing/filtering system applications)
* New Utility: pc-systemflag (shell) — pc-systemflag is used to set a flag/message on the system for cross-application communication
* Rewrite the pc-systemupdatertray utility to use the new SystemFlagWatcher. Is much simpler and more streamlined now.
* Add system flag usage to pc-softwaremanager for PBI update availability
* Add system flag usage to the pbi-manager (“pbi_update –check-all� usage only)
* Add system flag usage to pc-updatemanager (for all package and system updates/checks)

9-STABLE-20120505 Snapshot Available for Testing

Kris has announced the availability of the next testing snapshot. If you are using Intel video or would like to upgrade from a previous snapshot, read the Errata section below.

The next snapshot in the PC-BSD 9-STABLE branch has just been released
for i386 and amd64 architectures. This snapshot provides both users and developers a means to test out new features in the upcoming PC-BSD 9.1 release. This snapshot may contain buggy code and features, so users are encouraged to run it only on non-critical systems.

Changes since the previous Snapshot:

* FreeBSD 9-STABLE from 05-01-2012
* Xorg 7.5.2 / Xorg-server 1.10.6
* Includes the GEM kernel support patches
* Added fail2ban for SSH brute force blocking
* Added ossec to base system
* Added support for all i18n languages currently in Pootle
* Fixed sorting of installed Applications in AppCafe
* Fixed some bugs in server install causing CLI apps to fail
* Fixed stamping boot on BootCamp partitions.
* Enable starting Warden jails at system bootup
* Enable booting installer on systems with < 512MB of RAM
* Enabled splash screen support
* Multiple bugfixes to included utilities / apps

Highlights for the upcoming 9.1:

* New system installer! Greatly simplified for desktop and server installs.
* New “PC-BSD Server

Update on PC-BSD Localization

Kris sent the following update to the translations mailing list regarding menu localizations:

I wanted to give you a quick status update on some of the changes for Translations in the 9-STABLE snapshots, and eventually PC-BSD 9.1.

First, all languages which are available in Pootle will now be selectable for installation. Should a string not be fully translated, the default English string will be displayed instead. This will allow you to begin testing any/all languages in the upcoming snapshots.

Second, I have removed the “pbimeta.po

BSDCan Trip Report: Thomas Abthorpe

The Foundation recently sponsored Thomas Abthorpe to attend BSDCan 2011. Here is his trip report:

The first time I was privileged to attend BSDCan was in 2009, a generous sponsorship from the FreeBSD Foundation enabled me to attend. Of the many topics I could have reported on, I chose to identify the human aspect of FreeBSD, the people that make it happen, and why the Foundation sends developers to conferences.

To me, people are still the most valuable resource in the project. I have mentored in many committers to the ports tree, and at BSDCan 2011, I was pleased to learn that two of my mentees would be attending. Rene Ladan (rene@) and Baptiste Daroussin (bapt@) would be in Ottawa, and for the first time ever, I would meet my proteges face to face. Julien Laffaye had been collaborating with Bapt, and was here for the presentations. Our sense of camaraderie in IRC made the initial meeting feel like a well established friendship. Our travels around Ottawa became a standing joke, “A Canadian, Dutchman and a pair of Frenchmen walk into a ...

The Importance of Speaking at Conferences

In Why We Send Developers to Conferences, Thomas Abthorpe discussed the value in face-to-face networking with both committers and BSD users.

In this post, Ion-Mihai Tetcu discusses the importance of BSD developers speaking at non-BSD specific and international conferences. His report also shows some of the lessons that can be learned from meeting with users and learning first-hand how a global project is meeting their local needs.

I had the opportunity, with the Foundation's help, to participate as a speaker at FISL 10 in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. This year's anniversary edition had 8,232 paying attendees, speakers from 28 countries, a lot of vendors and user groups, and a powerful media presence. FISL was sponsored, among others, by the Brazilian Federal Government and Brazil's President Mr. Luis Ignacio Lula da Silva gave a nice speech .

Open source in Brazil has a powerful momentum, being promoted by the federal and various states and local governments. It is seen as a way to reduce the country's dependency on foreign companies, a way to reduce unemployment, and generate local revenues and expertise. It is used by the national bank, federal government institutions and even by local subsidiaries of big multinational companies. Open Source in Brazil pretty much equals Linux, especially RedHat, Suse and Debian (who all have powerful user-groups) and a few local distributions. (Free)BSD is also used, especially by telcos and in the embedded market. More that 50% of the attendees didn't understand English and the situation is even worse in the general public. This practically implies that, without localization, a software product can not have any significant market share in Brazil.

Apart from my DSPAM talk, I gave a general talk about FreeBSD ports and packages and PCBSD's PBIs, was one of the hosts of the BSD-Meeting and assisted at the FUG-BR stand. Unfortunately, the other BSDs had zero presence. The 6 hours of the BSD-Meeting were a micro-conference attended by 65-70 people. Of the 5 talks, 3 could have easily found a place on the main schedule and I repeatedly kicked those speakers for not submitting their talks to FISL organizers. From the Brazilian user's perspective, the biggest problem faced is the lack of a localized version of FreeBSD. For example, I was asked if we could provide a framework for localizing the OPTIONs and pkg-message of our ports. When faced with a new operating system, many users will choose a localized Linux variant over the effort of learning both a new operating system and a new language. As a first step, I am pursuing with the PC-BSD folks the idea of doing a custom-built PC-BSD variant localized for Brazil. Marcelo Araujo presented what the translation process implies and one of the results of the BSD-Meeting is a restart ofthe Brazilian Documentation Project.

Lacking any promotional materials except a few posters, the FUB-BR booth didn't attract as many people as the other booths. However, it was a place where people could meet some FreeBSD committers and we had many interesting discussions with both FreeBSD and Linux users. One of the things practically everybody I spoke with during the conference told me was that they desire international speakers. At least 30 people attended FISL because there was a FreeBSD speaker from abroad. I think this is an important idea and that we should also encourage developers to give talks at general F/OSS conferences.