BSDday

BSDday (http://bsdday.org/), University of Buenos Aires' Faculty of natural and exact sciences, Buenos Aires, Argentina 9 August, 2014. BSDday Argentina is a conference for users, sysadmins and developers of BSD software and based systems. The conference is for anyone developing, deploying and using systems based on FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFlyBSD and others *BSD. BSDday Argentina is a technical conference and aims to collect the best technical papers and presentations available to ensure that the latest developments in our open source community are shared with the widest possible audience.

Getting to know your portmgr-lurker: William Grzybowski

From July to the end of October two new lurkers will have the opportunity to get insights into FreeBSD portmgr internals, namely William Grzybowski and Nicola Vitale. William was the first to answer our interview so let’s get to know him a bit better.

 

Name

William Grzybowski

Committer name

wg

Inspiration for your IRC nick

my name initials

 TLD of origin

.br

 Current TLD (if different from above)

Occupation

Software engineer

 Blog

None

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

Stability and simplicity

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

I don’t recall, too long ago!

Who was your mentor(s)

culot, jpaetzel

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

Breaking INDEX, but hey, who ever didn’t? ;)

vi(m) /  emacs / other

vim

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

The passion of everyone in the zoo about it. You can very easily see a
guy angry by someone’s else commit like stealing candy from his son :)

Favorite musician/band

AC/DC

What book do you have on your bedside table

book? what is that? :)

coffee / tea / other

coffee, beer (but real beer, no corn!)

How would you describe yourself

Calm and mind-centered

sendmail / postfix / other

postfix

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

Play soccer, gym

What is your favorite TV show

Fringe

Claim to Fame

I was mentored by culot and I survived! Just kidding, I have none, I am a joke!

What did you have for breakfast today

An orange and a slice of yogurt cake

What sports team do you support

Gremio Foot-Ball Porto Alegrense, brazillian soccer team

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

I do work mostly in python ports and help closing PRs.

2014Q3 Branched

The 2014Q3 branch has just been branched and the package builder has been
updated to use that branch. This means that the next update on the quarterly
packages will be on the 2014Q3 branch.

What happened during the last 3 months:
- 177 different committers have participated
- 9918 commits happened
- diffstat says: 23646 files changed, 554070 insertions(+), 577210 deletions(-)

What does that means for users:
- default Java is now 1.7
- massive conversion to stagedir (93% of the ports are now properly staged)
- massive improvement of the usage of libtool (which reduces a lot overlinking)
- new USES: mono, objc, drupal, gecko, cpe, gssapi, makeinfo
- new Keywords for plist: @sample, @shell
- LibreOffice has been updated to 4.2.5
- Firefox has been updated to 30.0
- Firefox-esr has been updated to 24.6
- Default postgresql has moved from 9.0 to 9.2
- nginx has been updated to 1.6.0
- Default lua is 5.2
- subversion has been split into multiple ports for each features
- On FreeBSD 9-STABLE and 10-STABLE the default xorg 1.12.4 (for default binary
packages it is still 1.7.7)
- Improved QA checking in the infrastructure
- Info files are handle correctly even if base has been built WITHOUT_INFO
- Ancient emacs version has been cleaned out

FreeBSD 9.3-RC2 Now Available

FreeBSD 9.3-RC2 Now Available


The second RC build of the 9.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums can be found in the PGP-signed announcement email.

ISO images and, for architectures that support it, the memory stick images are available here:

    http://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/ISO-IMAGES/9.3/

(or any of the FreeBSD mirror sites).

If you notice problems you can report them through the normal Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/9.3" branch.

A list of changes since 9.2-RELEASE are available on the 9.3-RELEASE release notes page here:


Changes between 9.3-RC1 and 9.3-RC2 include:
  • A bug in the fast rx buffer recycle path has been fixed in the cxgbe(4) driver.
  • A bug that would incorrectly allow two listening SCTP sockets on the same port bound to the wildcard address has been fixed.
  • Multiple vulnerabilities have been fixed in file(1) and libmagic(3).  [FreeBSD-SA-14:16.file]
  • A workaround has been implemented to fix serial ports on certain motherboards, in particular the Intel D2500CCE board.
  • A bug in bsdgrep(1) that would prevent certain pattern matching has been fixed.
  • The bsdconfig(8) utility has been updated to support pkg(8)-format packages.
  • Firmware for the cxgbe(4) Chelsio T4 and T5 cards has been updated to version 1.11.27.0.
The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

    # freebsd-update upgrade -r 9.3-RC2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically performed merging was done correctly.

    # freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.

    # shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:

    # freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example, FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the misc/compat8x port can be installed to provide other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted into the new userland:

    # shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

    # freebsd-update install

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

FreeBSD 9.3-RC2 Available

The second RC build for the FreeBSD-9.3 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

fossil in prison

Since my last post about how I do host fossil I have been asked write about the new setup I do have

The jail content

I have created a minimal jail:

$ find /usr/local/jails/fossil -print
/usr/local/jails/fossil/var
/usr/local/jails/fossil/var/tmp
/usr/local/jails/fossil/libexec
/usr/local/jails/fossil/libexec/ld-elf.so.1
/usr/local/jails/fossil/bin
/usr/local/jails/fossil/bin/sh
/usr/local/jails/fossil/bin/fossil
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib/libc.so.7
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib/libssl.so.7
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib/libreadline.so.8
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib/libz.so.6
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib/libcrypto.so.7
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib/libncurses.so.8
/usr/local/jails/fossil/lib/libedit.so.7
/usr/local/jails/fossil/data
/usr/local/jails/fossil/dev

/bin/sh is necessary to get the exec.start jail argument to work /var/tmp is necessary to get fossil to open his temporary files (I created it with 1777 credential) /data is a empty directory where the fossil files will be stored

Jail configuration

The configuration file is the following:

fossil {
	path = "/usr/local/jails/fossil";
	host.hostname = "fossil.etoilebsd.net";
	mount.devfs;
	ip4.addr="127.0.0.1";
	exec.start = "/bin/fossil server -P 8084 --localhost --files *.json,*.html,*.js,*.css,*.txt --notfound /index.html /data &";
	exec.system_jail_user = "true";
	exec.jail_user = "www";
	exec.consolelog = "/var/log/jails/fossil.log" ;
}

More about fossil itself

In /data I created an index.html which is an almost empty html with a bit of Javascript.

When loading the javascript will request a list.txt file.

This file contain the list of repositories I want to show publically (one per line).

For each of them the javascript will use the json interface of fossil (meaning your fossil has to be built with json) and gather the name and the description of the repo to print them on the index.

Starting/Stopping the service

2 simple command are necessary to manage the service:

Starting up:

# jail -c fossil

Stopping:

# jail -r fossil

The service is only listening on the localhost, it is up to you to create your reverse proxy, in my case I do use nginx with the following config:

server {
	server_name fossil.etoilebsd.net;
	listen       [::]:443 ssl;
	listen       443 ssl;
	ssl_certificate     ssl/fossil.crt;
	ssl_certificate_key ssl/fossil.key;

	location / {
		client_max_body_size 10M;
		proxy_buffering off;
		proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:8084/;
		proxy_set_header HTTPS on;
		proxy_set_header   Host             $host;
		proxy_set_header   X-Real-IP        $remote_addr;
		proxy_set_header   X-Forwarded-For  $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
	}
}

PC-BSD 10.0.2 Released!

The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of the next PC-BSD quarterly update, version 10.0.2!

This update includes a number of important bug fixes as well as newer packages and desktops, such as KDE 4.12.5, Cinnamon 2.2.13, Gnome 3.12.2, and more. This release also includes an alpha release of the new Lumina desktop which is being developed on PC-BSD. For more details and updating instructions, refer to the notes below.

Notable Changes:

  • KDE 4.12.5
  • Cinnamon 2.2.13
  • Gnome 3.12.2
  • Alpha release of Lumina desktop
  • Revamped AppCafe and PBI subsystems, integrated fully with FreeBSD’s PKGNG
  • AppCafe support for application screenshots, 5-Star rating system and comments integrated with our Wiki
  • Unified various UI elements and keyboard shortcuts
  • Integrated package cleanup functionality into AppCafe / PBI system
  • Updated Control Panel UI with additional view options and asynchronous item reading
  • Improved UI notification between applications and tray notification systems
  • Added PulseAudio as default audio backend for all packages which can support it
  • Added full-disk encryption options with GELI, which does *not* require a separate un-encrypted /boot partition
  • Support for automatic boot-environment creation before doing any upgrades or updates to the system or packages
  • Boot-environment support for full-disk encrypted installations
  • Added support for adding snapshot “Comments”
  • Options to set L2Arc / ZIL devices during installation
  • Many other bugfixes and improvements to Life-Preserver, Warden and more

A more detailed list of changes can be found in What’s New in 10.0.2.

Updating:

Desktop users already running 10.0 can update via Control Panel -> Package Manager -> Updates. Server users can update via the “pc-updatemanager” command-line utility.

If package updating fails due to conflict errors, please be sure to apply all system updates first before trying again.

After updating and rebooting, please run the AppCafe once to begin the conversion process from the old style PBIs to 10.0.2 packages.

Installing:

10.0.2 DVD/USB media can be downloaded from here.

Reporting Bugs:

Found a bug in 10.0.2? Please report it (in as much detail as possible) to our Trac Database.

VC4 driver week 1

It's been a week now, and I've made surprising amounts of progress on the project.

I came in with this giant task list I'd been jotting down in Workflowy (Thanks for the emphatic recommendation of that, Qiaochu!). Each of the tasks I had were things where I'd have been perfectly unsurprised if they'd taken a week or two. Instead, I've knocked out about 5 of them, and by Friday I had phire's "hackdriver" triangle code running on a kernel with a relocations-based GEM interface. Oh, sure, the code's full of XXX comments, insecure, and synchronous, but again, a single triangle rendering in a month would have been OK with me.

I've been incredibly lucky, really -- I think I had reasonable expectations given my knowledge going in. One of the ways I'm lucky is that my new group is extremely helpful. Some of it is things like "oh, just go talk to Dom about how to set up your serial console" (turns out minicom fails hard, use gtkterm instead. Also, someone else will hand you a cable instead of having to order one, and Derek will solder you a connector. Also, we hid your precious dmesg from the console after boot, sorry), but it extends to "Let's go have a chat with Tim about how to get modesetting up and running fast." (We came up with a plan that involves understanding what the firmware does with the code I had written already, and basically whacking a register beyond that. More importantly, they handed me a git tree full of sample code for doing real modesetting, whenever I'm ready.).

But I'm also lucky that there's been this community of outsiders reverse engineering the hardware. It meant that I had this sample "hackdriver" code for drawing a triangle with the hardware entirely from userspace, that I could incrementally modify to sit on top of more and more kernel code. Each step of the way I got to just debug that one step to go from "does not render a triangle" back to "renders that one triangle." (Note: When a bug in your command validator results in pointing the framebuffer at physical address 0 and storing the clear color to it, the computer will go away and stop talking to you. Related note: When a bug in your command validator results in reading your triangle from physical address 0, you don't get a triangle. It's like a I need a command validator for my command validator.).

https://github.com/anholt/linux/tree/vc4 is the code I've published so far. Starting Thursday night I've been hacking together the gallium driver. I haven't put it up yet because 1) it doesn't even initialize, but more importantly 2) I've been using freedreno as my main reference, and I need to update copyrights instead of just having my boilerplate at the top of everything. But next week I hope to be incrementally deleting parts of hackdriver's triangle code and replacing it with actual driver code.

FreeBSD 9.3-RC1 Now Available

FreeBSD 9.3-RC1 Now Available

The first RC build of the 9.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums can be found in the PGP-signed announcement email.

ISO images and, for architectures that support it, the memory stick images are available here:

    http://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/ISO-IMAGES/9.3/

(or any of the FreeBSD mirror sites).

If you notice problems you can report them through the normal Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/9.3" branch.

A list of changes since 9.2-RELEASE are available on the stable/9 release notes page here:


Changes between 9.3-BETA3 and 9.3-RC1 include:
  • Various bug fixes in the hptrr(4) driver.
  • Time zone data has been updated to tzdata2014e.
  • Handling of the '-P' flag without '-p' or '-r' has been fixed in the daemon(8) utility.
  • A bug in the nvme(4) controller initialization path has been fixed.
  • A bug in the fast receive buffer recycle path has been fixed in the cxgbe(4) driver.
The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

    # freebsd-update upgrade -r 9.3-RC1

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically performed merging was done correctly.

    # freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.

    # shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:

    # freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example, FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the misc/compat8x port can be installed to provide other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted into the new userland:

    # shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

    # freebsd-update install

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

FreeBSD 9.3-RC1 Available

The first RC build for the FreeBSD-9.3 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

new job!

Yesterday was my first day working at Broadcom. I've taken on a new role as an open source developer there. I'm going to be working on building an MIT-licensed Mesa and kernel DRM driver for the 2708 (aka the 2835), the chip that's in the Raspberry Pi.

It's going to be a long process. What I have to work with to start is basically sample code. Talking to the engineers who wrote the code drops we've seen released from Broadcom so far, they're happy to tell me about the clever things they did (their IR is pretty cool for the target subset of their architecture they chose, and it makes instruction scheduling and register allocation *really* easy), but I've had universal encouragement so far to throw it all away and start over.

So far, I'm just beginning. I'm still working on getting a useful development environment set up and building my first bits of stub DRM code. There are a lot of open questions still as to how we'll manage the transition from having most of the graphics hardware communication managed by the VPU to having it run on the ARM (since the VPU code is a firmware blob currently, we have to be careful to figure out when it will stomp on various bits of hardware as I incrementally take over things that used to be its job).

I'll have repos up as soon as I have some code that does anything.

PC-BSD at SouthEast LinuxFest

SouthEast LinuxFest will take place June 20–22 at the Sheraton Charlotte Airport in Charlotte, NC. Registration for this event  is free.

There will be a BSD booth in the expo area on both Friday and Saturday from 9:00–17:00. As usual, we’ll be giving out a bunch of cool swag, PC-BSD DVDs, and FreeNAS CDs, as well as accepting donations for the FreeBSD Foundation. Ken Moore will present “PBI v10: Application Management Made Easy” at 13:30 on Friday and Dru Lavigne will present “ZFS 101″ at 13:30 on Saturday. The BSDA certification exam will also be held at 11:00 On Sunday.

10.0.2-RC2 Available for Testing

PC-BSD 10.0.2-RC2 images are now online for testing from our download site.

This will (hopefully) be our last RC before releasing 10.0.2 officially sometime on or around the 23rd. We have addressed or fixed most tickets related to the 10.0.2 release, so if you are still running into any issues, please report them using our Trac database.

Users running EDGE or earlier 10.0.2 images can upgrade their packages to the RC2 versions via AppCafe or Package Manager.

Thanks for all your help testing, and the issues reported so far!

FreeBSD 9.3-BETA3 Now Available

FreeBSD 9.3-BETA3 Now Available


The third BETA build of the 9.3-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums can be found in the PGP-signed announcement email.

ISO images and, for architectures that support it, the memory stick images are available here:

    http://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/ISO-IMAGES/9.3/

(or any of the FreeBSD mirror sites).

If you notice problems you can report them through the normal GNATS PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

Please note, as the FreeBSD bug tracking system is undergoing maintenance, the PR system may be unavailable.  Problem reports submitted this maintenance period are being queued for later processing.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "stable/9" branch.

A list of changes since 9.2-RELEASE are available on the stable/9 release notes page here:


Changes between 9.3-BETA2 and 9.3-BETA3 include:
  • A new ttys(5) flag, onifconsole, has been added, which activates ttyu0 if the device is an active kernel console.
  • The NFSv4 server now allows creating a hard link to a symbolic link, as was allowed in NFSv3.
  • OpenSSL has been updated to 0.9.8za.
  • A deadlock caused by incorrect reference counts has been fixed in the usb(4) driver.
  • The arc4random(3) library has been updated to match that in FreeBSD-CURRENT.
  • The amount of data collected by hwpmc(4) has been increased to work with modern processors and available RAM.
  • A new pmcstat(8) flag, '-l', has been added, which ends event collection after the specified number of seconds.
The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

    # freebsd-update upgrade -r 9.3-BETA3

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically performed merging was done correctly.

    # freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.

    # shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:

    # freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example, FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the misc/compat8x port can be installed to provide other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted into the new userland:

    # shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

    # freebsd-update install

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

FreeBSD 9.3-BETA3 Available

The third BETA build for the FreeBSD-9.3 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

BSDCan Trip Report: Li-Wen Hsu

The next trip report is from Li-Wen Hsu:

I am very excited for having the chance to join the most important and largest annual BSD conference. Thanks to the FreeBSD Foundation, it's my first year to attend BSDCan. The main motivation for attending is that I'm in part of the project started by Craig Rodrigues, Jenkins CI for FreeBSD, and and I am honored to be invited join that group.
 

I arrived in Ottawa on May 13th. After checking into Residence and taking a short nap to ease jet-lag, I went to the Royal Oak Pub to join the pre-party of the developers. Sean Bruno quickly recognized me and introduced me to other developers. I talked with Steve Wills, Mark Linimon, Gavin Atkinson, and met Peter Wemm, my roommate.
 

The first day of the Developer Summit started with presentations about changes to the support plan and brainstorming about FreeBSD 11. During the break, I spoke to Mark Johnston, who completed the last piece of axge(4), our first USB 3.0 to gigabit ethernet adapter driver. It is written mainly by Kevin Lo and I provided some fixes in rx/tx routines. During our chat, we discussed the performance issues of axge(4) where he discovered there might be a limitation of calling rx/tx routines numbers per second in the USB stack. This is done by just a few lines of DTrace code. I was totally shocked by that and decided that I should learn more about it.
 

In the afternoon, I joined The Java working group where Greg Lewis introduced the history, current status, and we discussed the future plans of the Java port. We talked about how to improve user experience, support for important Java software, and the known problems of Java on FreeBSD. There was also a discussion on how to to get more developers who want to develop Java applications on FreeBSD. We think that DTrace support might be attractive for people who run Java on FreeBSD.

We had Thai food in the Hacker Lounge for dinner. George V. Neville-Neil and I talked about how to make more people develop or support their software on FreeBSD. I showed him Travis CI which is used by many open source projects developed on GitHub for their continuous integration needs. However, it cannot support FreeBSD in the near future. Being a ports committer for several years, I feel that many projects are willing to support FreeBSD, but lack the environment and experience. I think we should work more with external communities to address this. We discussed the possibility of establishing such a service for FreeBSD, following the successful model of RedPorts. There are many tricky parts and security issues to consider. Furthermore, the most important part is manpower. If any reader is interested in helping, please contact me.
 

On the second day of the Developer Summit, I went to the Continuous Integration and Testing with Jenkins for FreeBSD working group in the morning. In the first part of the meeting, Craig introduced Jenkins and how it is utilized in the FreeBSD.org cluster. He also covered the internal architecture of jenkins.FreeBSD.org. In the second part of the meeting, we discussed the next steps to work on this year. Craig and I helped Julio Merino set up a Jenkins instance on his laptop and Julio quickly hacked Kyua to let it generate JUnit output which can be parsed by Jenkins. This is very exciting to us because it means that we can have a trackable and easy-to-read continuous integration report. We believe this can help developers and contributors to produce higher quality code and to find items they can start to work on.
 

In the afternoon, I joined the Documentation Translation System Session where Benedict Reuschling introduced a process to translate documentation just like using gettext for software i18n and l10n. This process is done by translating docbook XML files to .po files with po4a, then translators can use their favorite po file editor to concentrate on the content instead of struggling with non-human readable XML files. It is also possible to establish a "translation memory" to remember the phrases and sentences that have already been translated for sharing between documents, which reduces duplicated work from translators. We also talked about a wish: one web-based system where casual translators can fix a translation by clicking a mouse while the backend takes care of the rest. The doc committers or another contributor can commit the change back to the doc repository.
 

Finally, I asked about continuous integration for the doc tree. Warren Block suggested that we can run igor for checking the errors, however there are some false positives that would bother people. During BSDCan, I joined two of the Doc Sprints. One night I asked Warren about "safe parameters" for igor and I quickly hacked igor to generate the checkstyle format XML output and pass it to the Jenkins checkstyle plugin. I presented the proof of concept on the second night. It is really great that people thought it is useful and encouraged me to setup it as a job on jenkins.FreeBSD.org. Warren will help me with this. In the future, this could also integrate with Phabricator as a "lint" tool for being as a filter.
 

I always wanted to revive the Traditional Chinese Document Translation Project. Fortunately, about two weeks after BSDCan, a volunteer sent a mail to the freebsd-doc mailing list stating that he wants to contribute to the Traditional Chinese translation of the FreeBSD Handbook. After discussing with him and with the help from people on EFNet/#bsddocs and doceng, I converted zh_TW from Big5 to UTF-8 in the doc tree for making future translation easier. This is really a good restart and I hope more people can join and we can have a complete Traditional Chinese handbook and other documents soon.
 

The following two days were the BSDCan sessions. The starting keynote speaker was Karl Lehenbauer from FlightAware. The most rememberable might be the slide "A billion dollars + Linus <= good people with a rigorous engineering process doing BSD." Also, there are some slides about FreeBSD tuning at FlightAware.
 

In Luigi Rizzo's talk In-kernel OpenvSwitch on FreeBSD, I learned a lot about how to port the Linux kernel subsystem to FreeBSD. In his work, he provides netlink sockets for the FreeBSD kernel. This is very good news because I always heard that people who are familiar with Linux want this feature.
 

Patrick Kelsey gave the libuinet talk. This is used to port the FreeBSD TCP/IP stack to userland. It means that the resource needed for a connection is in userspace memory and the kernel only needs to provide a packet interface, such as netmap. This is useful for an application that handles lots of concurrent connections. Patrick became a committer recently and I hope more work from him can bring libuinet closer to HEAD soon.
 

Pawel Jakub Dawidek and Mariusz Zaborski talked about their work on Capsicum and Casper. In this talk, they presented the lack of traditional security mechanism (setuid(2), chroot(2), P_SUGID, setrlimit(2)) provided by the system, and how an easier protection is provided by Capsicum. The Casper daemon provides services to sandboxed processess which do not have the necessary rights.
 

The FreeBSD Developer Summit and BSDCan overlap for one day. May 16 is the public track of the dev summit and I attended two sessions. Michal Dubiel from Semihalf gave the status update of OpenStack and OpenContrail on a FreeBSD host. I am glad that there are companies which invest in cloud technologies for FreeBSD. I hope this can be in production soon and maybe the FreeBSD cluster can have some setup to enrich developer resources. Another session I attended is lightweight reference counting, by Gleb Smirnoff. Using counter(9) in FreeBSD 10 as a reference count is really a brilliant idea. I am looking forward to seeing performance improve with this solution.
 

Arun Thomas gave a good tutorial of ARM and how BSD supports it. For a person like myself with no experience in embedded systems, it was a good start. Now I can have more fun with my Raspberry Pi.
 

Julio Merino talked about The FreeBSD Test Suite, which is really important to me and the FreeBSD continuous integration group. He also announced the plan to combine Kyua and Jenkins in the session. He hopes that the tests can be more complete and the CI pipeline can be more mature. There are still lots of things to be done!
 

Matt Ahrens presented the goals of the OpenZFS project and its current status. With this project, platforms like Illumos, FreeBSD, Linux, and OS X can directly interact with a shared, platform-independent ZFS code base. This will greatly reduce the effort to port changes between platforms and the tests can also be shared. The future of the OpenZFS features are amazing, including resumable zfs send/recv and device removal, which can make a system administrator's€™ life much easier.
 

The ASLR talk by Shawn Webb was awesome and this is definitely a feature that a paranoid person like myself  hope will be merged to the main trunk soon. It seems to still have problems on ARM so he also asked for help from people with ARM experience.
 

On return home, I was surprised that Peter and I were on the same flight and sat next to each other. We talked about Linux containers and the projects that use it like Docker, which is the part that FreeBSD is not doing well. Currently, the resource limitation of the lightweight containers is not really complete. He said that the way we using servers, or the "computing nodes", are changing in lightspeed and we should not be left behind. We both agree that a modern operating system should put more effort in cloud and mobile solutions.
 

I would like to thank the FreeBSD Foundation again for sponsoring me to attend this great event. I made new friends and met people who only know each other on the Internet before. We shared many good ideas and it is really awesome to know there are so many people working on FreeBSD. I hope I can participate again next year!

PC-BSD at Texas LinuxFest

There will be a BSD booth at Texas LinuxFest to be held June 13 and 14 at the Austin Convention Center in downtown Austin, Texas. Several members of the PC-BSD team will be at the booth and will be giving out cool swag, PC-BSD DVDs, FreeNAS CDs, and accepting donations for the FreeBSD Foundation. Registration for this event is $30 or $60 and the expo area is open on Friday from 12:00–18:00 and on Saturday from 10:00 to 18:00.

On Saturday, Josh Smith will present  Introduction to PC-BSD 10.0 and Dru Lavigne will present Graphical ZFS Management Tools.

The BSDA certification exam will also be available on Friday at 10:00. The cost of the exam is $75.