Need community feedback on new role system for PC-BSD

Hey everyone! We are considering a new way to install a more
customized PC-BSD experience called “Roles”. Roles would be a
installation experience for PC-BSD that would allow more flexibility
and a more focused package installation based on what you need or want
for your role. If you are a web developer maybe you need an IDE or
packages specifically focused on that. If you are wanting the best
desktop workstation experience maybe you would get an installation
with libreoffice and some other productivity apps.

We hope to also be able to bring these different roles to you in the
form of pre-made virtualbox / vmware images that are ready to be
rolled out. This would hopefully save you a little bit of time as
they’d be significantly smaller by not including a bunch of
unnecessary packages for your role. You would also be able to select
during a normal PC-BSD DVD / USB installation whether or not you want
to use a pre-defined role to setup your system.

We need your help and input to define what roles are important to you
as users and what packages you would suggest that they include. (I.E.
if you are installing a
{developer/web-designer/network-admin/consumer} workstation, what
would be the custom set of packages you need? You can contribute to
the discussion by responding on the forums, blog, or mailing lists.

Forum link: https://forums.pcbsd.org/showthread.php?t=23266

Getting to know your portmgr-lurker: ehaupt@

Let us welcome Emanuel, our second lurker who will learn a bit more about portmgr duties for the next four months and who started by answering our usual questionnaire.

 

Name

Emanuel Haupt

Committer name

ehaupt

Inspiration for your IRC nick

Same as my default UID so that people can find me.

TLD of origin

.ch

Occupation

System Engineer

When did you join portmgr@

Beginning of november 2014 as a lurker.

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

It’s been my primary server/desktop OS since years. I always liked the
documentation and found things generally easier to achieve than with
Linux. I was also fascinated by ports. At the time I was manually
downloading solaris packages from “sun freeware” when someone showed me
ports. I think it is no surprise that I switched to FreeBSD. I always
found the community to be very friendly and helpful. Finally with pkgng
I feel the same sense of excitement all over again.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

Pav Lucistnik (pav)

Who was your mentor(s)

Roman Bogorodskiy (novel)

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

Can’t think of any particular one. In general breaking things tends to
be embarrassing.

Boxers / Briefs / other

Boxers

vi(m) /  emacs / other

Mostly nvi but more and more vim.

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

pkgng, poudriere, the friendly and helpful community, ZFS, geli,
stability of the OS to name just a few.

What book do you have on your bedside table

Arnaldur Indriðason – The Draining Lake

coffee / tea / other

Coffee!!!

Do you have a guilty pleasure

Reddit and coin mining.

How would you describe yourself

Sysadmin, traveller, adventurer, motorcycler, dog person.

sendmail / postfix / other

sendmail.

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

I am a passionate motorcycler. I love riding my motorcycle in the more
mountainous regions of Europe. After a long day at work you often see
me on my motorcycle riding towards the sunset. I also have a
fascination for the nordic culture and literature. I’m taking Swedish
lessons since 2011.

Claim to Fame

Driving from Oberstaufen, Germany to Amman/Jordan using no highways in
3 weeks in a 20 year old Audi A4. Maintaining 195 ports and keeping
them all up to date and working.

What did you have for breakfast today

Swiss-Muesli with Coffee

What sports team do you support

None.

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

Porting and maintaining ports that I’m interested in.

Any parting words you want to share

I’m just glad to have the opportunity to work with so many highly
skilled people on the FreeBSD project.

Getting to know your portmgr-lurker: ak@

From now on and for the next four months the FreeBSD ports team is pleased to welcome two new portmgr-lurkers: ak@ and ehaupt@. Alex was the first to answer our questionnaire so let’s get to know him a bit better.

 

Name
Alex (Олександр)

Committer name
ak

Inspiration for your IRC nick
Committer name

TLD of origin
ua

Current TLD (if different from above)
es

Occupation
Independent contractor

When did you join portmgr@
Just a lurker atm, 2014-11-01

Blog
None

Inspiration for using FreeBSD
I tried linux first.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD
itetcu

Who was your mentor(s)
eadler, itetcu. Thanks, guys.

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD
I broke the INDEX, twice.

vi(m) /  emacs / other
vi(m)

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD
It sucks less.

Favourite musician/band
Ritchie Blackmore/Queen

What book do you have on your bedside table
A Night in the Lonesome October (The Halloween was a few days ago).

coffee / tea / other
Tea, green.

Do you have a guilty pleasure
Sometimes I watch The Muppets instead of doing something useful.

How would you describe yourself
Too lazy.

sendmail / postfix / other
exim

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD
Tons. The bikes, skydiving, amateur Martial Arts, poetry.

What is your favourite TV show
The Muppets

Claim to Fame
Nothing so far.

What did you have for breakfast today
Fried rice with mushrooms

What sports team do you support
I don’t support teams, I play when I can (regrettably, not that often lately).

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD
Fiddling with portlint, xorg, zfs filestorages, various odd jobs.

Any parting words you want to share
Have more fun.

What is your .sig at the moment
Alex

AsiaBSDCon 2015

AsiaBSDCon 2015 (http://2015.asiabsdcon.org/), Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo, Japan 12 - 15 March, 2015. AsiaBSDCon is a conference for users and developers on BSD based systems. The conference is for anyone developing, deploying and using systems based on FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFlyBSD, Darwin and MacOS X. AsiaBSDCon is a technical conference and aims to collect the best technical papers and presentations available to ensure that the latest developments in our open source community are shared with the widest possible audience.

FreeBSD 10.1-RC4 Now Available

The fourth RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

This is anticipated to be the final RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE cycle.

The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/10.1" branch.

A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available here.

Changes between 10.1-RC3 and 10.1-RC4 include:
  •  Fix ATA CF ERASE breakage for certain CF cards.
  •  Fix a race in pmap_emulate_accessed_dirty() that could trigger a EPT misconfiguration VM-exit.
Important note to ZFS users on the i386 architecture:  Using multi-disk ZFS configurations on i386 (mirror, raidz-1, raidz-2, etc.) may cause
a kernel panic on boot.

Adding 'options KSTACK_PAGES=4' to the kernel configuration is observed to resolve the problem.  Please *do* *not* upgrade your system with freebsd-update(8) if using a multi-disk ZFS setup, since this will override the kernel configuration with the GENERIC kernel.

This is also mentioned in the 10.1-RELEASE Errata Documentation.
    Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-RC4 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

    The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

    The partition layout is:
    • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
    To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

    # mkdir -p /dist
    # mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

    Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg bootstrap

    At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install Gnome and Xorg, run:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
      xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

    The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
    FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

    # freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-RC4

    During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
    performed merging was done correctly.

    # freebsd-update install

    The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


    # shutdown -r now

    After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


    # freebsd-update install
    It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
    FreeBSD 9.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
    into the new userland:

    # shutdown -r now

    Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

    # freebsd-update install

    Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

    PC-BSD 10.1-RC2 Released

    The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of RC2 images for the upcoming PC-BSD 10.1 release. This RC includes many minor bug-fixes from RC2, along with new UEFI support for boot / install.

    PC-BSD 10.1 notable Changes

    * KDE 4.14.2
    * GNOME 3.12.2
    * Cinnamon 2.2.16
    * Chromium 38.0.2125.104_1
    * Firefox 33.0
    * NVIDIA Driver 340.24
    * Lumina desktop 0.7.0-beta
    * Pkg 1.3.8_3
    * New AppCafe HTML5 web/remote interface, for both desktop / server usage
    * New CD-sized text-installer ISO files for TrueOS / server deployments
    * New Centos 6.5 Linux emulation base
    * New HostAP mode for Wifi GUI utilities
    * Misc bug fixes and other stability improvements
    * NEW! — UEFI support for boot and installation

    TrueOS

    Along with our traditional PC-BSD DVD ISO image, we have also created a CD-sized ISO image of TrueOS, our server edition.

    This is a text-based installer which includes FreeBSD 10.0-Release under the hood. It includes the following features:

    * ZFS on Root installation
    * Boot-Environment support
    * Command-Line versions of PC-BSD utilities, such as Warden, Life-Preserver and more.
    * Support for full-disk (GELI) encryption without an unencrypted /boot partition

    Updating

    A testing update is available for 10.0.3 users to upgrade to 10.1-RC2. To apply this update, do the following:

    edit: /usr/local/share/pcbsd/pc-updatemanager/conf/sysupdate.conf (As root)

    Change “PATCHSET: updates”

    to

    “PATCHSET: test-updates”

    % sudo pc-updatemanager check

    This should show you a new “Update system to 10.1-RELEASE” patch available. To install run the following:

    % sudo pc-updatemanager install 10.1-update-10152014–10

    NOTICE

    As with any major system upgrade, please backup important data / files beforehand!!!

    This update will automatically reboot your system several times during the various upgrade phases, please expect it to take between 30–60 minutes.

    Getting media

    10.1-RC2 DVD/USB media can be downloaded from this URL via HTTP or Torrent.

    Reporting Bugs
    Found a bug in 10.1? Please report it (with as much detail as possible) to our bugs database.

    FreeBSD 10.1-RC4 Available

    The fourth RC build for the FreeBSD 10.1 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

    bsdtalk246 – Playing with tor

    Looking forward to attending MeetBSD in California this weekend.  Still working on finding a new /home for all my stuff, but thank you all who have offered suggestions and hosting.
    Playing with tor, but under no illusions that it makes me safe.

    One trick I did was to add the following to my pf.conf file on OpenBSD:

    block out all
    pass out proto { tcp, udp } all user _tor

    File info: 19Min, 9MB

    Ogg Link: https://archive.org/download/bsdtalk246/bsdtalk246.ogg

    PC-BSD Forums Now Support Tapatalk

    The PC-BSD forums are now accessible on Tapatalk. Tapatalk is a free forum app for your smartphone that lets you share photos, post, and reply to discussions easily on-the-go.

    Tapatalk can be downloaded from here. Once installed,  search “forums.pcbsd.org” from the Tapatalk Explore tab. Be sure to  add the “PC-BSD Forums” search result, not just “PC-BSD”.

    PC-BSD at MeetBSD

    Several members of the PC-BSD and FreeNAS teams will be attending MeetBSD, to be held on November 1 and 2 in San Jose, CA. There’s some great presentations lined up for this event and registration is only $75.

    As usual, we’ll be giving out PC-BSD and FreeNAS media and swag. There will also be a FreeBSD Foundation booth that will accept donations to the Foundation. The BSDA certification exam will be held at 18:00 on November 1.

    Pootle Translation System is now Updated to Version 2.5.1.1!

    If any of you have tried to use the PC-BSD Translation / Pootle web interface in the last year you probably don’t have a lot of good things to say about it.  A 35 word translation might take you a good 30 minutes between the load times (if you could even login to the site without it timing out).  Thankfully those days are behind us!  PC-BSD has upgraded their translation system to use Pootle version 2.5.1.1 and it is blazingly fast.  I went through localizing a small 35 word applet for PC-BSD and it took me roughly 4 minutes compared to what would have taken at least half an hour before due to the slowness of the old pootle software.  Check out the new translation site at translate.pcbsd.org.

    There’s a couple of things you are going to want to keep in mind about the new translation system.  You will have to create a new account.  Upgrading Pootle directly was proving disastrous so we exported all the strings and imported them into the new Pootle server.  What this means is no accounts were transferred since a direct upgrade was not done.  This also means that the strings that were brought in also appear as “fuzzy” translations.  If you have some free time you can help by going to the translation site and approving some of the fuzzy translations.  Many languages have already been done they just need to be reviewed and marked as acceptable (uncheck the fuzzy box if you are 100% certain on the translation).

    I hope you guys are as excited as I am over the new translation possibilities!  For more information on how you can help with localization / translating contact me at [email protected]

    Best Regards,

    –Josh

     

    EuroBSDCon Trip Report: Kamil Czekirda

    The next trip report is from Kamil Czekirda:

    The FreeBSD Foundation sponsored my trip to Sofia, Bulgaria in September 2014, where I attended the FreeBSD DevSummit and EuroBSDcon 2014. I'm a GSoC student and it was my first DevSummit. I would like to thank the FreeBSD Foundation for sponsoring my trip, Gavin Atkinson for an invitation to the DevSummit, Mariusz Zaborski for support during the conference, and the mentor of my project, Devin Teske, for directions.

    I arrived in Sofia on Wednesday evening, found my Hill hotel, checked in, and dropped off my luggage. I tried to contact Mariusz, the only person I knew. It was too late for lounging about so I stayed for the rest of the day at the hotel.

    The first day of the Developer Summit started with self-presentations and trying to divide participants into smaller groups. It didn’t happen and everybody stayed in the room for one track. It was the first time I could see who is who, because I knew only people’s nicks or names . That day we discussed the future of the 11.0 release, 10/40/100GigE, ports and packages, embedded systems, mainly ARM and MIPS, and tools and support for cross-compilation. That day I met some people: the first was Michał Dubiel from Semihalf. We talked about Network Virtualization, SDN, and OpenContrail. The next person was Daniel Peyrolon, another GSoC student. I showed him my project and he showed me his magic. During lunch break, Mariusz introduced me to Hiroki Sato. We talked about the organization of the conference from the organizers’ side.

    The second day of the DevSummit started by dividing groups in two parts. The first track was about developer tools like Phabricator and Jenkins and DNS and DNSSEC on FreeBSD. The second track was about ASLR. I attended the first track. I tried to pass BSDA certificate, so I missed the most important aspects of the DNS session. After lunch break, we had a discussion about crypto algorithms and a documentation session. It was my first DevSummit, so I was only an observer. Next person who Mariusz introduced me to was Gavin Atkinson, but there was no time to talk, just say 'Hi'.

    The main conference started on Saturday with Jordan Hubbard's keynote about the past and the future of FreeBSD. I stayed in this track for the next talks. Kris Moore talked about PC-BSD and features based on ZFS, such as snapshots, replication, and encrypted zfs-root with only one pool. Next talk which I attended was about implementation of ZFS. Kirk McKusick made the introduction to internal implementation. After lunch break I joined John-Mark Gurney’s talk about optimizing GELI performance. Results of speed benchmark are amazing. For the rest of the talks, I changed the room and attended Henning Brauer’s talk about OpenBGPD. He talked about the history of the open source implementation of the Border Gateway Protocol. Next, I changed the track the second time and joined Peter Hessler’s talk about routing domains. The last talk was about using QEMU and cross-compilation packages for the ARM architecture. Sean Bruno made a demonstration on how to use those tools. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to attend the amazing Andy Tanenbaum’s talk. After the last speech, I found Gavin and we talked about my GSoC project, the documentation for it, and what I should do in the near future. He offered me his help and introductions to people from the community who could take a look at my code. That day I met Jakub Klama, who is also from Poland. He said 'Hi' in Polish and I was surprised. Jakub was the third FreeBSD GSoC student attending EuroBSDcon 2014. It was sad as I expected to meet more students.

    During a social event I met with Eric Allman and Kirk McKusick. Of course, Mariusz was the middleman. Eric told us a lot of stories from his life, about the first steps of networking and transatlantic communication. He drew attention to students’ bad practices on memory management and how important it is. I talked with Kirk about my project and how GSoC looks from the organizational side.

    The second day of EuroBSDcon was less busy for the people after the social event. I started with Baptiste Daroussin’s talk about cross building. I attended  the LibreSSL and ASLR talks. Very interesting for me was the talk about OpenContrail and OpenStack for FreeBSD. Michał Dubiel described software architecture and support for OpenContrail and OpenStack in the FreeBSD world. The most interesting talk was about securing sensitive data at the
    University of Oslo. Dag-Erling Smøgrav described the system they use. The keynote was very interesting too. Atanas Chobanov showed us how to use SecureDrop, Tails, and Tor for anonymously submitting documents. During the closing session, Deb Goodkin presented about the FreeBSD Foundation, and Shteryana Shopova and Paul Schenkeveld presented about the EuroBSD Foundation. After the closing session, we organized an unofficial social event.

    I think that attending conferences is a huge motivation for work for new people. It was a great opportunity to meet people I had known only from the Internet. I hope I will be able to participate in DevSummits and BSD conferences again in the future.

    More RSS UDP tests – this time on a Dell R720

    I've recently had the chance to run my RSS UDP test suite up on a pair of Dell R720s. They came with on-board 10G Intel NICs (ixgbe(4) in FreeBSD) so I figured I'd run my test suite up on it.

    Thank you to the Enterprise Storage Division at Dell for providing hardware for me to develop on!

    The config is like in the previous blog post, but now I have two 8-core Sandy Bridge Xeon CPUs to play with. To simply things (and to not have to try and solve NUMA related issues) I'm running this on the first socket. The Intel NIC is attached to the first CPU socket.

    So:


    • CPU: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2650 0 @ 2.00GHz (2000.04-MHz K8-class CPU) x 2
    • RAM: 64GiB
    • HTT disabled
    /boot/loader.conf:

    # ... until ncpus is tunable, make it use 8 buckets.
    net.inet.rss.bits=3
    net.isr.maxthreads=8
    net.isr.bindthreads=1

    This time I want to test with 8 streams, so after some trial and error I found the right IPv4 addresses to use:

    • Server: 10.11.2.1/24
    • Client: 10.11.2.3/24, 10.11.2.2/24, 10.11.2.32/24, 10.11.2.33/24, 10.11.2.64/24, 10.11.2.65/24, 10.11.2.17/24, 10.11.2.18/24
    The test was like before - the server ran one rss-udp-srv program that spawns one thread per RSS bucket. The client side runs rss-clt programs to generate traffic - but now there's eight of them instead of four.

    The results are what I expected: the contention is in the same place (UDP receive) and it's per-core - it doesn't contend between CPU cores.

    Each CPU is transmitting and receiving 215,000 510-byte UDP frames a second. It scales linearly - 1 CPU is 215,000 TX/RX frames a second. 8 CPUs is 215,000 TX/RX frames a second * 8. There's no degrading as the CPU core count increases.

    That's 1.72 million packets per second. At 510 bytes frames it's about 7 gigabits/sec in and out.

    The other 8 cores are idle. Ideally we'd be able to run an application in those cores - so hopefully I can get my network / rss library up and running enough to prototype an RSS-aware memcached and see if it'll handle this particular workload.

    It's a far cry from what I think we can likely achieve - but please keep in mind that I know I could do more awesome looking results with netmap, PF_RING or Intel's DPDK software. What I'm trying to do is push the existing kernel networking subsystem to its limits so the issues can be exposed and fixed.

    So, where's the CPU going?

    In the UDP server program (pid 1620), it looks thus:

    # pmcstat -P CPU_CLK_UNHALTED_CORE -T -w 1 -p 1620
    PMC: [CPU_CLK_UNHALTED_CORE] Samples: 34298 (100.0%) , 155 unresolved

    %SAMP IMAGE      FUNCTION             CALLERS
      8.0 kernel     fget_unlocked        kern_sendit:4.2 kern_recvit:3.9
      7.0 kernel     copyout              soreceive_dgram:5.6 amd64_syscall:0.9
      3.6 kernel     __mtx_unlock_flags   ixgbe_mq_start
      3.5 kernel     copyin               m_uiotombuf:1.8 amd64_syscall:1.2
      3.4 kernel     memcpy               ip_output:2.9 ether_output:0.6
      3.4 kernel     toeplitz_hash        rss_hash_ip4_2tuple
      3.3 kernel     bcopy                rss_hash_ip4_2tuple:1.4 rss_proto_software_hash_v4:0.9
      3.0 kernel     _mtx_lock_spin_cooki pmclog_reserve
      2.7 kernel     udp_send             sosend_dgram
      2.5 kernel     ip_output            udp_send

    In the NIC receive / transmit thread(s) (pid 12), it looks thus:

    # pmcstat -P CPU_CLK_UNHALTED_CORE -T -w 1 -p 12

    PMC: [CPU_CLK_UNHALTED_CORE] Samples: 79319 (100.0%) , 0 unresolved

    %SAMP IMAGE      FUNCTION             CALLERS
     10.3 kernel     ixgbe_rxeof          ixgbe_msix_que
      9.3 kernel     __mtx_unlock_flags   ixgbe_rxeof:4.8 netisr_dispatch_src:2.1 in_pcblookup_mbuf:1.3
      8.3 kernel     __mtx_lock_flags     ixgbe_rxeof:2.8 netisr_dispatch_src:2.4 udp_append:1.2 in_pcblookup_mbuf:1.1 knote:0.6
      3.8 kernel     bcmp                 netisr_dispatch_src
      3.6 kernel     uma_zalloc_arg       sbappendaddr_locked_internal:2.0 m_getjcl:1.6
      3.4 kernel     ip_input             netisr_dispatch_src
      3.4 kernel     lock_profile_release __mtx_unlock_flags
      3.4 kernel     in_pcblookup_mbuf    udp_input
      3.0 kernel     ether_nh_input       netisr_dispatch_src
      2.4 kernel     udp_input            ip_input
      2.4 kernel     mb_free_ext          m_freem
      2.2 kernel     lock_profile_obtain_ __mtx_lock_flags
      2.1 kernel     ixgbe_refresh_mbufs  ixgbe_rxeof

    It looks like there's some obvious optimisations to poke at (what the heck is fget_unlocked() doing up there?) and yes, copyout/copyin are really terrible but currently unavoidable. The toeplitz hash and bcopy aren't very nice but they're occuring in the transmit path because at the moment there's no nice way to efficiently set both the outbound RSS hash and RSS bucket ID and send to a non-connected socket destination (ie, specify the destination IP:port as part of the send.) There's also some lock contention that needs to be addressed.

    The output of the netisr queue statistics looks good:

    root@abaddon:/home/adrian/git/github/erikarn/freebsd-rss # netstat -Q
    Configuration:
    Setting                        Current        Limit
    Thread count                         8            8
    Default queue limit                256        10240
    Dispatch policy                 direct          n/a
    Threads bound to CPUs          enabled          n/a

    Protocols:
    Name   Proto QLimit Policy Dispatch Flags
    ip         1    256    cpu   hybrid   C--
    igmp       2    256 source  default   ---
    rtsock     3    256 source  default   ---
    arp        4    256 source  default   ---
    ether      5    256    cpu   direct   C--
    ip6        6    256   flow  default   ---
    ip_direct     9    256    cpu   hybrid   C--

    Workstreams:
    WSID CPU   Name     Len WMark   Disp'd  HDisp'd   QDrops   Queued  Handled
       0   0   ip         0    25        0 839349259        0       49 839349308
       0   0   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       0   0   rtsock     0     2        0        0        0       92       92
       0   0   arp        0     0      118        0        0        0      118
       0   0   ether      0     0 839349600        0        0        0 839349600
       0   0   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       0   0   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       1   1   ip         0    20        0 829928186        0      286 829928472
       1   1   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       1   1   rtsock     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       1   1   arp        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       1   1   ether      0     0 829928672        0        0        0 829928672
       1   1   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       1   1   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       2   2   ip         0     0        0 835558437        0        0 835558437
       2   2   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       2   2   rtsock     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       2   2   arp        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       2   2   ether      0     0 835558610        0        0        0 835558610
       2   2   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       2   2   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       3   3   ip         0     1        0 850271162        0       23 850271185
       3   3   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       3   3   rtsock     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       3   3   arp        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       3   3   ether      0     0 850271163        0        0        0 850271163
       3   3   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       3   3   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       4   4   ip         0    23        0 817439448        0      345 817439793
       4   4   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       4   4   rtsock     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       4   4   arp        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       4   4   ether      0     0 817439625        0        0        0 817439625
       4   4   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       4   4   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       5   5   ip         0    19        0 817862508        0      332 817862840
       5   5   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       5   5   rtsock     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       5   5   arp        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       5   5   ether      0     0 817862675        0        0        0 817862675
       5   5   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       5   5   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       6   6   ip         0    19        0 817281399        0      457 817281856
       6   6   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       6   6   rtsock     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       6   6   arp        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       6   6   ether      0     0 817281665        0        0        0 817281665
       6   6   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       6   6   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       7   7   ip         0     0        0 813562616        0        0 813562616
       7   7   igmp       0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       7   7   rtsock     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       7   7   arp        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       7   7   ether      0     0 813562620        0        0        0 813562620
       7   7   ip6        0     0        0        0        0        0        0
       7   7   ip_direct     0     0        0        0        0        0        0
    root@abaddon:/home/adrian/git/github/erikarn/freebsd-rss # 

    It looks like everything is being dispatched correctly; nothing is being queued and/or dropped.

    But yes, we're running out of socket buffers because each core is 100% pinned:

    root@abaddon:/home/adrian/git/github/erikarn/freebsd-rss # netstat -sp udp
    udp:
            6773040390 datagrams received
            0 with incomplete header
            0 with bad data length field
            0 with bad checksum
            0 with no checksum
            17450880 dropped due to no socket
            136 broadcast/multicast datagrams undelivered
            1634117674 dropped due to full socket buffers
            0 not for hashed pcb
            5121471700 delivered
            5121471044 datagrams output
            0 times multicast source filter matched

    There's definitely room for improvement.

    PC-BSD 10.1-RC1 Released

    The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of RC1 images for the upcoming PC-BSD 10.1 release.

    PC-BSD Notable Changes

    * KDE 4.14.2
    * GNOME 3.12.2
    * Cinnamon 2.2.16
    * Chromium 38.0.2125.104_1
    * Firefox 33.0
    * NVIDIA Driver 340.24
    * Lumina desktop 0.7.0-beta
    * Pkg 1.3.8_3
    * New AppCafe HTML5 web/remote interface, for both desktop / server usage
    * New CD-sized text-installer ISO files for TrueOS / server deployments
    * New Centos 6.5 Linux emulation base
    * New HostAP mode for Wifi GUI utilities
    * Misc bug fixes and other stability improvements

    TrueOS

    Along with our traditional PC-BSD DVD ISO image, we have also created a CD-sized ISO image of TrueOS, our server edition.

    This is a text-based installer which includes FreeBSD 10.0-Release under the hood. It includes the following features:

    * ZFS on Root installation
    * Boot-Environment support
    * Command-Line versions of PC-BSD utilities, such as Warden, Life-Preserver and more.
    * Support for full-disk (GELI) encryption without an unencrypted /boot partition

    Updating

    A testing update is available for 10.0.3 users to upgrade to 10.1-RC1. To apply this update, do the following:

    edit: /usr/local/share/pcbsd/pc-updatemanager/conf/sysupdate.conf (As root)

    Change “PATCHSET: updates”

    to:

    “PATCHSET: test-updates”

    % sudo pc-updatemanager check

    This should show you a new “Update system to 10.1-RELEASE” patch available. To install run the following:

    % sudo pc-updatemanager install 10.1-update-10152014–10

    NOTICE

    As with any major system upgrade, please backup important data  and files beforehand!!!

    This update will automatically reboot your system several times during the various upgrade phases, please expect it to take between 30–60 minutes.

    Getting media

    10.1-RC1 DVD/USB media can be downloaded from here via HTTP or Torrent.

    Reporting Bugs

    Found a bug in 10.1? Please report it (with as much detail as possible) to our bugs database.

     

    Sponsor Spotlight: Silicon Valley FreeBSD Developer and Vendor Summit

    The FreeBSD Foundation has been a long-time sponsor of events like the upcoming FreeBSD Developer and Vendor Summit. This year we would also like to thank Microsoft and RootBSD for their extended support of the event.  Opportunities to bring the developer and vendor communities together to further the Project would not be possible without the support of companies like these two. Please take a minute and find out more about why these organizations are involved with the FreeBSD Project.


    Microsoft's customers have been clear that they want a single hypervisor for their environments, whether they are running Windows, Linux or FreeBSD operating systems. Microsoft is committed to working with the FreeBSD Foundation to ensure that FreeBSD is a first-class guest operating system on Windows Server Hyper-V and is focused on improving reliability, performance and support of new Hyper-V features in our upcoming updated release of BSD Integration Services. Find out more here.


    RootBSD is a provider of hosting services with an emphasis on the BSD family of operating systems.   As users of FreeBSD ourselves, we believe it is important to contribute back to the community and do so by sponsoring services for individual developers as well as events such as the Developer's Summit.  We are thrilled to be able to support the Silicon Valley Developer's Summit, as we've seen first hand the results that face-to-face meetings can have in sparking new ideas and discussions that might not happen through strictly online communication. Find out more about RootBSD here.