Last Day to Make 2013 Donation to The FreeBSD Foundation

It's hard to believe that 2014 is just around the corner! We've raised around $660,000 so far as of 7PM Colorado Time December 30. We also have $75,000 in pledges that we should be receiving soon! We only have around 24 hours left to reach our goal of raising $1,000,000. Here is my plea to ask for your help. Please consider making a donation. It is so easy to do. Just click here to make a donation online or to find out where to mail a check. If you file US taxes, most likely your donation will be tax-deductible. If you send a check, please mail it tomorrow (December 31). For the donation to count towards 2013, the envelope has to be postmarked by December 31. Writing 2013 donation on your check doesn't work for our accounting.

This year has been amazing. Because of our successful fundraising campaign last year, we were able to support the FreeBSD Project and community in so many ways. You can read my appeal here to see where we spent the money this year.

There are three areas where we've grown the most. One is our FreeBSD development work. We now have two staff members working on FreeBSD projects, a full-time employee working on FreeBSD System Administration and Release Engineering work, and we have a Project Manager who is not only overseeing all of our funded projects, but also working on project roadmaps and helping facilitating collaboration between our corporate users and FreeBSD developers. This is helping to bring in more corporate sponsors too.

We've also increased our FreeBSD advocacy by producing professional FreeBSD marketing brochures, white papers, literature, and our new FreeBSD Journal that will be debuting in a few weeks!

Lastly, we've spent over $100,000 on hardware to improve the FreeBSD infrastructure. This equipment resides in our four co-location facilities at NYI, Sentex, Yahoo!, and ISC.

Our End-of-Year newsletter highlights everything we supported this last year. Take a few minutes to read up on why we need your donations and how we spend the money.

Thank you for your support!

Deb Goodkin
Secretary/Treasurer
The FreeBSD Foundation

P.S. Making a donation is quick and easy! Click here to make a donation now.


Faces of FreeBSD – Isabell Long

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Isabell's Story


My name is Isabell Long, and I am a 19-year-old living in the south of England. I'm a Ruby on Rails web developer at a social media startup named Gerraroom and a volunteer staff member of the freenode IRC network. I love open data and—on the non-tech side—good food, music (both playing and listening) and learning. Before FreeBSD, I contributed documentation and support for Ubuntu, which was a good introduction into the world of open source.

Friends hinted that I should try FreeBSD by posting me burned CDs of releases. Then in 2011, I decided to participate in the Google Code-In contest, completing documentation-related tasks and becoming heavily involved in the documentation project afterwards. I became a documentation committer in April 2012. The new committer mentoring process proved very useful and that, plus the accepting community of FreeBSD, are reasons why I stay involved.

Thanks to FreeBSD Foundation funding, I was able to attend my first overseas conference at EuroBSDcon 2013 in Malta. Apart from the experience of going to a country I’d never visited before, meeting people who I only knew on IRC and seeing some people I met at the DevSummits in Cambridge was one of the best bits. The documentation sessions were very useful and I completed a few tasks on the website and Handbook during my time there and afterwards. I'm looking forward to having a few similarly productive days in Bulgaria next year.

As a thank you for providing resources to keep FreeBSD going and enabling committers like me to travel to conferences, I donated a small amount in Malta to the FreeBSD Foundation as I strongly believe that giving where possible keeps positivity going and one day, that repays.

Isabell Long




Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

Weekly Feature Digest 12/27/13

Just a short update today to let you all know what the low down is!

PC-BSD version 10.0 Release Candidate 2 is now live!  Please note this is a beta-test release and NOT an official release.  For more information on RC2 please visit the following blog page: http://blog.pcbsd.org/2013/12/pc-bsd-10–0-rc2-available/ .   PC-BSD 10.0 Release RC2 can be downloaded from http://iso.cdn.pcbsd.org/.

Quick Note:  Please report any bugs found @ trac.pcbsd.org.  The window is closing to get bug reports in before official release and we need to try to get any “major� or higher priority bugs knocked out before then.

Kris has reported today that he is in the final stages of getting virtualbox working on PC-BSD 10.0.  He has fixed many of the seg fault issues that we were seeing from previous versions and will be looking to have these packages ready in the next week or so hopefully by RC3.

AMD KMS support appears to be improving based on my first interactions with the new 10.0 release RC2 image.  I’ve noticed much less graphical distortion, and better stability all around.

Tons of bugfixes and stability improvements went in today so big thanks to everyone involved for knocking those out.  We are still aware of the issue with the FreeBSD bootloader not functioning, but rest assured Kris is putting in every effort to get this resolved for you quickly.

That’s it for this week folks!

Best Regards,

Josh

PC-BSD 10.0-RC2 Available

The first PC-BSD 10.0-RELEASE image, based upon FreeBSD 10.0-RC2, is now available for download!

Disclaimer

This image is still a pre-release version of the upcoming 10.0-RELEASE. There is a known issue with VirtualBox not yet working, so if you rely upon this functionality you should wait to update until it is fixed in RC3, or the official RELEASE.

Updating

Online updating to 10.0-RELEASE is not yet enabled, but will be for the next test revision based upon FreeBSD 10.0-RC3.

10.0-RELEASE notable features

  • Includes FreeBSD 10.0-RC2 from 12/19/2013
  • Updated KMS / AMD driver support
  • ISO file is a hybrid USB file, and can be “dd“ed to a USB media.
  • New text-based installer
  • New UEFI loader on installation media
  • Able to select between GRUB/BSD loaders during installation
  • New desktops! Gnome 3, Mate (Replaces Gnome2) and Cinnamon
  • And much more!

Reporting Issues

Found a bug? Please report it, in as much detail as possible, to our Trac database.

FreeBSD 10.0-RC3 Now Available

The third RC build of the 10.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow at the end of this email.

ISO images and, for architectures that support it, the memory stick images are available here.

Important note to freebsd-update(8) users:  Please be sure to follow the instructions in the following FreeBSD Errata Notices before upgrading the system to 10.0-RC3:



Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.0-RC3 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.

Changes between -RC2 and -RC3 include:

  • Several minor bugfixes and functionality enhancements to bhyve.
  • Add new sysctl, kern.supported_archs, containing the list of FreeBSD MACHINE_ARCH values whose binaries this kernel can run.
  • Add a pkg(8) repository configuration file for cdrom-based package installation.
  • Implement a fix to allow bsdconfig(8) to be able to install packages included on the DVD.
  • Fix pkg(8) multi-repository support by properly respecting 'enabled' flag.
  • Fix Xen build without INET.
  • Several bugfixes to bsdinstall(8).
  • Fix a ZFS-related panic triggered by an incorrect assertion.
  • Fix mountroot> prompt eating most of the characters by not enabling RXRDY interrupts in the attach routine.
  • Fix a regression in ng_ksocket(4).
  • Apply patch from upstream Heimdal for encoding fix.

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

FreeBSD 10.0-RC3 Available

The third RC build for the FreeBSD-10.0 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

Getting to know your portmgr@ — Bryan Drewery

In this interview, we talk to the newest member of the team, Bryan Drewery.  Bryan first came to the attention of many by adopting portupgrade and friends, and then jumping into pkgng and poudriere.

Name

Bryan Drewery

Committer name

bdrewery

TLD of origin

.net

<Editor’s note: while Bryan claims to be a netizen, it is believed he is originally from .us :)>

Occupation

Software Engineer

When did you join portmgr@

March 2013. Joined FreeBSD as a committer in August 2012. As a contributor
in March 2012.

Blog

http://blog.shatow.net is my blog. I have not made much effort on it yet but
have a lot of ideas and content to add eventually.

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

It took a long time for me to discover FreeBSD. I wish I had 10 years
sooner. My first experience with a computer was with MS-DOS 5. Then I worked
up through Windows 3.1, 95, 98, XP. Somewhere around here I discovered Redhat
5 and shortly after Debian and Gentoo. In high school I took an AP CS class
that used FreeBSD 4, which was my first introduction to it. My first
introduction to ports was in the same class where not having root and wanting
to install an application I went into /usr/ports/irc/BitchX and tried to ‘make
install’ and failed of course. I still wish this worked. Shortly after that I
started doing work for a Shell Hosting company that used FreeBSD 4.10. At this
time I was still much more fond of Linux though. When I met my Wife, she was
also doing Shell Hosting with FreeBSD. That’s when I started doing actual
development on it and customizing the system. I found that with FreeBSD I
could customize the system far more than I could with any Linux distribution.
This is what sold me the most and led me away from Linux. Though I do still
use Linux for Xen dom0 and some development.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

Probably garga@ qmail patches I sent in years ago. Once I discovered pkgng
though it was bapt@. That’s what led me to becoming a committer. I actually
knew zi@ outside of FreeBSD too from when I was an EFNet oper.

Who was your mentor(s)

Baptiste Daroussin (bapt@) and Eitan Adler (eitan@)

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

Wiping systems of course. One of which was someone else’s system who ran my
bad code!

vi(m) / emacs / other

I was a longtime (6 years) pico/nano poweruser (haha) until I discovered vim
in my first real job.

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

I just like to write code. It’s hard for me to let go of things I put a lot
of effort into! I got into this with the intent to help get packaging working
for my own servers and to takeover ports that were abandoned that I felt were
critical for my servers.

Favorite musician/band

There’s so many. Lately I’ve been listening to metalcore and post-hardcore
bands. http://www.last.fm/user/bdrewery has all of the music I listen to.

What book do you have on your bedside table

Design and Implementation of FreeBSD, Kindle, C++ Standard Template Library
(C++11).

coffee / tea / other

I used to drink insane amounts of diet Mt. Dew. Not anymore though, no
caffeine for me.

Do you have a guilty pleasure

I get into games every now and then. Xbox 360, PS3, PC, Wii. I love Windows
7. I’ve been a Mac user for a few months now as well.

sendmail / postfix / other

qmail. My mail server is something that I setup years ago, hacked at quite a
bit with custom patches and never want to redo again.

What is your favorite TV show

Breaking Bad, Lost, The Wire, Dr. Who, Sons of Anarchy, Dexter.

What sports team do you support

I’m not really into rooting on sports teams. I enjoy playing much more than
watching.

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

I maintain upstream for portupgrade and poudriere, help with pkgng, qmail,
openssh-portable. I also am starting to work more in the src world. I maintain
portmaster but have not put much real effort into it. For portmgr I help test
Mk/ patches, I do exp-runs, help manage the package building systems, and fix
Mk/ bugs as I run across them.

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I was involved with the eggdrop IRC bot project and have been maintaining a
pretty popular fork of my own for the past 10 years.

Any parting words you want to share

Getting involved with Open Source is really easy. We’re all volunteers like
you. Just start helping. Send patches, bug reports, code, documentation,
translations, typo fixes. Everything helps.

What is your .sig at the moment

Regards,
Bryan Drewery

Faces of FreeBSD – Kevin Martin

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Kevin's Story


My name is Kevin Martin, and I am the CEO and Founder of pair Networks, Inc. I've been a computer person since I was very young. My father made a wise investment in the very first Model 5150 of the IBM PC. He brought home the 64KB model with two floppy disk drives in October 1981, and I immediately moved up from writing games on the HP-41C, and in BASIC on notebook paper.

In junior high and high school, I was "that kid" who helped fix computers, whether in the school's library or main office.  When I attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (for Computer Science, naturally), there were SunOS 4.1 workstations available to students, and I jumped into BSD-flavored UNIX with both feet.  Soon I was an assistant at the Image Processing Lab, which had the latest and greatest equipment on campus.

My other passion is pinball. As a pre-teen I hung out in the arcade when my mother went to her bowling league.  In college I discovered pinball tournaments, and started attending. Eventually I took over the Professional & Amateur Pinball Association and started running the world's largest pinball tournaments, twice yearly, just outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  More recently, I founded Replay Foundation, a non-profit that promotes the preservation, restoration, and enjoyment of pinball, with an emphasis on the player experience.

In the summer of 1995, I founded pair Networks, with an eye towards simple Web design projects.  I’d been running an FTP/Web site called "The Pinball Archive" since early 1993, and was paying a series of obscure ISPs to host it. While working on ideas for pair, I noticed that the latest ISP I was using, Best Internet Communications, was migrating their servers from BSDI to FreeBSD.

Curious, I borrowed a server from my uncle and installed FreeBSD 2.0.5. I was impressed and immediately hooked.  My experience with SunOS, combined with the power of FreeBSD, made it possible to launch my own hosting company—which is what pair Networks became.  In January 1996, our T-1 to Digital Express came online, and pair was launched with just a couple of Pentium servers, all running FreeBSD 2.1.  The Pinball Archive had found its permanent home.

Over the past 18 years, FreeBSD has been an asset to our operations, and while we have branched out a bit, we still primarily use FreeBSD and promote it whenever possible.  FreeBSD is a terrific technology with a terrific community.

Kevin Martin

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

PC-BSD Weekly Feature Digest 12/20/13

In the words of Dr. Sheldon Cooper (The Big Bang Theory TV Show), “i’m not insane…my mother had me tested�.  That’s the way i’m sure many of the devs felt at the end of this week.  While fending off the impending insanity caused by lack-of-flash-itis, the reason for our package issues with version 10.0 finally have started to come into focus.  For more information on the package / pkgng debacle please see this blog post: http://blog.pcbsd.org/2013/12/end-of-the-pkg-woes/.  Though we typically just recommend users just upgrade to new package sets, I personally opted to do a complete reinstall of 10.0 Beta P6.  The primary issue myself and many other developers kept running into was issues with the centOS linux compatibility layer that was just too buggy to make good use of at this time.

In other similar news PC-BSD is likely to begin starting a new version naming system to help differentiate the different types of releases and hopefully offer a little more clarity to users that may be less than familiar with the conventional FreeBSD naming system.  Along with the new naming system a new package release schedule will also be added to help users maintain more stability by not having to update their packages every couple of weeks.  Stay tuned for more information on this as it develops.

Flash is now working in both firefox and chromium as well as many other internet browsers.  The new PBI’s have been approved and include the fixes to make sure flash works with all the recent changes in version PC-BSD 10.0.  For Chromium look for the version of 31 ending in .63.  For Firefox look for version 25_01.  I’m not sure if the issue is widespread but there was an additional step needed to make flash work in firefox on one of my primary test systems.  If flash is working in other browsers, but not firefox run the command nspluginwrapper –v –a –i.  For some reason flashpluginctl on / off was not running the script as it was supposed to.  From most mainstream testing this looks to be a fairly minor and isolated issue.

PBI’s continue to be added to the PC-BSD AppCafe as well as tons of new compatibility updates for current 10.0 PBI’s.   Total PBI’s ready for PC-BSD’s 10.0 release are now in excess of 720.   PC-BSD version 9.2 has also been receiving tons of PBI updates so make sure to check those out as well!

Special thanks to Ken and Kris both as well for all the bug fixes you guys have committed this week (and for listening to my non-stop rants on why flash is so important).  The schedule has been insane, but the light at the end of the tunnel is near.

As we go into the new year soon we’d like to tell everyone thank you and wish you the best during the holidays.  I will now leave you with a bit of holiday cheer for all of who have or will experience that inevitable holiday computer failure.

Best Regards and Happy Holidays,

–Josh

On the twelfth day I left it, my PC gave to me:

Twelve programs stalling;
Eleven chips a-smoking;
Ten ports a-jamming;
Nine jails a-frying;
Eight times i’m crying;
Seven blown partitions;
Six bad controllers;
Five seeeeeeg faults; (singer should hold out seg just FYI)
Four bad blocks;
Three bad controllers;
Two faulty pools;
And a burnt-out CPU fan.

 

You need to construct additional pylons. Building wine for #FreeBSD

I’ve been playing Blizzards’s Starcraft 2 on Linux via wine emulation lately and thought I’d see if I can get the same thing working on FreeBSD via the emulators/i386-wine-devel port.  After talking with the fine folks in #bsdports on EFNet, I finally found a recipe that is poudriere friendly and seems to spit out something that sort of works.

David Naylor ([email protected]) has a working method for constructing wine on FreeBSD and this should work in most cases for using current.  The method is really designed for building a binary package for releases, most folks wouldn’t want to go down this route.

In order to begin, get poudriere configured and ready to go.  You’ll need to construct an i386 jail for the first part of this process.  Something like I show in my poudiere blog post

poudriere jail -c -j 11i386 -v head -a i386 -m svn

This will give you a build environment to get the 32bit binaries for wine built and packaged up for step 2.

poudriere builk -j 11i386 emulators/i386-wine-devel

If all goes well, you now have an i386 package of wine that will be consumed as a distfile for the amd64 package build.  I redefine PORTSDIR=/usr/local/poudriere/ports/default in /etc/make.conf.

If you are like me and use poudriere for everything, copy it to /usr/local/poudriere/ports/defaults/distfiles/freebsd:11:x86:64/

Now you’ll need to edit the emulators/i386-wine-devel distfile with the appropriate information generated from a sha256 and ls -l of your packagefile in your local i386 repo:

sha256 i386-wine-devel-1.7.7,1.txz

SHA256 (i386-wine-devel-1.7.7,1.txz) = 8d0073d1c10be9afbe7c3c9874a31ac110c1f96cf6ddcda74ca16d31bad55d1b

Modify this with the following to make it compatible with your system:

SHA256 (freebsd:11:x86:64/i386-wine-devel-1.7.7,1.txz) = 8d0073d1c10be9afbe7c3c9874a31ac110c1f96cf6ddcda74ca16d31bad55d1b

Modify the Makefile.inc to exclude checks for the OS version:

Index: Makefile.inc
===================================================================
— Makefile.inc    (revision 335346)
+++ Makefile.inc    (working copy)
@@ -41,10 +41,10 @@

.include <bsd.port.pre.mk>

-.if !(${OSVERSION} >= 803000 && ${OSVERSION} < 900000) && !(${OSVERSION} >= 901000 && ${OSVERSION} < 1000000)
-IGNORE=        binaries compiled for FreeBSD 8.3+ and 9.1+ only
-DISTFILES=
-.endif
+#.if !(${OSVERSION} >= 803000 && ${OSVERSION} < 900000) && !(${OSVERSION} >= 901000 && ${OSVERSION} < 1000000)
+#IGNORE=        binaries compiled for FreeBSD 8.3+ and 9.1+ only
+#DISTFILES=
+#.endif

.if ${PORT_OPTIONS:MGECKO}
RUN_DEPENDS+=   ${DATADIR}/gecko/wine_gecko-2.24-x86.msi:${PORTSDIR}/emulators/wine-gecko-devel

And now, you can try building the package in your *AMD64* poudriere build with:

poudriere bulk -j 11amd64 emulators/i386-wine-devel

If my instructions have succeeded, you now have a package suitable for installation on your amd64 machine that will now let you do wine things.

Now, I need to figure out what the Blizzard Network Installer is trying to do as it runs, self-updates and hangs.

End of the PKG woes

Hey everyone, I just wanted to let you know that the recent issues with package updates should be corrected with the new package set that just came out.

The graphical package manager will not be able to update to the new package set, instead you will need to run the following command manually:

sudo pkg upgrade

If this fails because of a package conflict, you will need to remove the offending package before trying the upgrade again. For instance, a number of user’s have had to run this command first:

sudo pkg remove –f py27-distribute-0.6.35

Once you have updated to the new package set, the graphical package utility will work perfectly fine again (since it got updated itself).

 

General background on the problem:

With the update of the new FreeBSD package utility (pkg) from 1.1.x ->1.2.x, there were a number of errors due to a bunch of backwards compatibility being missing in the new version. This meant that once you updated to the newer version you no longer had access to the packages on the PC-BSD repository (due to the changes in the repo format). Since our new 1.2.x packages were just released on the PC-BSD repo, you should now be able to continue changing your packages again. Another issue that came with 1.2.x was that a number of the utility flags all got changed suddenly — causing our graphical utility to need updating as well. We got that utility updated fairly quickly, but the updated package was in the new 1.2.x format — meaning that you have to use the command line to perform this one upgrade.

 

We are terribly sorry for the inconvenience. Please let us know here or on the forums if you run into any other issues.

FreeBSD Foundation Announces Capsicum Integration Project Completion

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce the successful completion of work on the improvement and integration of the Capsicum framework and the Casper services daemon. The Google Open Source Programs Office and the FreeBSD Foundation jointly sponsored Paweł Jakub Dawidek for this project.

Capsicum is a lightweight OS capability and sandbox framework developed at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. Capsicum extends the POSIX API, providing several new OS primitives to support object-capability security on UNIX-like operating systems. Capsicum is now a standard part of FreeBSD, and ports to other operating systems are in progress.

The Casper daemon provides an easy to use programming interface for services which are otherwise difficult or impossible to access in a capability sandbox, including DNS resolution, access to the password and system groups database, entropy, and sysctl system configuration nodes.

"Libcapsicum and the Casper daemon make it easier for application developers to take advantage of capability sandboxing -- a critical step in allowing not just web browsers, but also security-ciritical desktop applications such as mail readers and office suites, to mitigate security vulnerabilities," said Robert N. M. Watson, the FreeBSD Foundation board member and University of Cambridge lecturer who led the Google-funded Capsicum research project.

The new libnv library developed as part of this project simplifies inter-process communication, a critical aspect of the Capsicum sandboxing model. Redesigned capability rights allow for finer-grained control of individual capabilities by eliminating the previous limit on the number of different kinds of file-descriptor operations controlled by capabilities.

Capsicum API enhancements appear in FreeBSD 10.0 along with sandboxing of a number of base-system components; Casper will be available from FreeBSD 10.1 on, and will be used by a number of base system components including tcpdump and kdump.

Faces of FreeBSD – Shteryana Shopova

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Shteryana's Story


My name is Shteryana Shopova. I am 31 years old and live in Sofia, the capital of a small East European country called Bulgaria. I have a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Sofia and am finishing a Master’s degree in Computer and Network Security there. I was a guest lecturer at the Network Security course at my Alma Mater this semester, which, along with organizing EuroBSDCon 2014, is one of the biggest challenges I am facing in the next several months.

Away from computers, I enjoy the company of my family and friends, a glass of good wine, and outdoor sports.  I was on my school's female basketball team for a few years, and I still enjoy playing the game (I’m good at it). I learned to ski as a kid and I’m happy to be back on the ski slopes in Europe after suffering a serious ankle injury a couple of years ago. I am praying for lots of snow this winter.

My first exposure to FreeBSD was in 2004 when I was working for a company producing network devices. The OS that we developed and ran on the devices was based on WindRiver's vxWorks, with a TCP/IP stack derived from the very early ones from FreeBSD/NetBSD.  I often found myself looking at the projects' CVS repositories for solutions of problems that I encountered at work. In 2005, I did the Google Summer of Code program for FreeBSD, coding the client side of the SNMP protocol. Since all FreeBSD development has to happen on FreeBSD-current, I installed FreeBSD on my laptop—alongside the Windows and Slackware Linux I was running on it at the time. Several months later I realized that apart from FreeBSD, I hadn't booted the other two operating systems in months. So I wiped them out.

I try to help the FreeBSD Project any way I can. I am maintaining the native SNMP daemon and client code, doing bugfixes in networking related parts, testing the OS a lot by following the HEAD (a.k.a FreeBSD-CURRENT), and trying out new stuff that gets added there. The last couple of years I had to put off most of the technical work I do for FreeBSD in favor of finishing my formal education. Nevertheless, I continue to help by advocating for FreeBSD. I've given
FreeBSD-related talks on several occasions, organized a BSD-dedicated track at OpenFest (the largest local OpenSource conference), and proctored BSDCG certification exams (the equivalent of LPIs for BSD system administrators). I am also on the board of the EuroBSDCon Foundation in the role of the EuroBSDCon 2014 Organizing Committee Chair.

Why FreeBSD? I think it’s the only OS that so nicely fits all my needs. I appreciate the modern and easy-to-administer filesystem—ZFS, plenty of virtualization options including bhyve, the fast and modern networking stack, plenty of third party software via the ports and packages, and more. I value the extensive and good documentation, and the high quality and liberally licensed source code (so I can experiment, make modifications, or fix problems myself without having to wait for upstream patches, or even sell it without any legal concerns). Finally, by interacting with the FreeBSD community and developers—the entire BSD community in fact—I've learned so much and continue to learn. I think it has shaped me as the professional I am today, and I am very thankful for that.

I think the FreeBSD Foundation is doing a great job of supporting the project. As a developer, the most important activities of the Foundation are funding developers to work on various projects, sponsoring FreeBSD-related technical events, and giving travel grants to developers so that we have a chance to meet physically and discuss ideas, projects, and problems. A couple of years ago I added SNMPv3 authentication, encryption, and access control to bsnmpd(1), along with a module for monitoring wireless interfaces. People had asked for those additions for some time; I doubt I would have had the time and resources to implement them if the Foundation hadn't sponsored me.

I want to appeal to everyone: if you like FreeBSD, please consider a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation, so we can make FreeBSD even better. And I hope to see you at EuroBSDCon next year in Sofia!


Shteryana Shopova



Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

FreeBSD 10.0-RC2 Now Available

The second RC build of the 10.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

See the release announcement email for image checksums.

Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.0-RC2 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.

Changes between -RC1 and -RC2 include:

  • Fix a crash when attempting to use a non-disk device as an iSCSI LUN.
  • Fix handling of empty iSCSI authentication groups.
  • Fix a regression in bsdinstall(8) that prevented the system from decrypting GELI providers when installing ZFS on GELI.
  • Several Radeon KMS bug fixes.
  • Several wireless bug fixes.
  • Several clang bug fixes.

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

# freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.0-RC2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically performed merging was done correctly.

# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.

# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:

# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example, FreeBSD 9.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted into the new userland:

# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

# freebsd-update install


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FreeBSD 10.0-RC2 Available

The second RC build for the FreeBSD-10.0 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.