iTerm2, solarized, ssh, and ls colors

It took me a while to figure this out, but in the end I found out why I couldn’t see ls colors when logging over SSH to a linux box from iTerm2 using the solarized color scheme. It turns out solarized does something that makes the ls colors indistinguishable over ssh. My solution was to have LS_COLORS set to “di=00;34:ln=00;35:so=00;32:pi=01;33:ex=00;31:bd=00;34″ on the Linux box I ssh’ed into. You obviously must have an alias ls –color=auto and the right TERM variable (I use xterm-256color) on that box too. For BSD ls I use LSCOLORS set to “gxfxbEaEBxxEhEhBaDaCaD” to get ls colors.

Posted from Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

FreeBSD 10.0-RC1 Now Available

The first RC build of the FreeBSD 10.0-RELEASE cycle is now available.

Please refer to the announcement email for the image checksums.

Please see the change list for an important note regarding the bsdinstall(8) ZFS on GELI option.

ISO images and, for architectures that support it, the memory stick images are available here.

If you notice problems you can report them through the normal GNATS PR system or here on the -current or -stable mailing lists.

Important note to freebsd-update(8) users:  Please be sure to follow the instructions in the following FreeBSD Errata Notices before upgrading the system to 10.0-RC1:


Changes between -BETA4 and -RC1 include:

  • Fix to a regression in bsdinstall(8) that prevents ZFS on GELI installation from working correctly.
    • Please note: a last-minute problem was found in 10.0-RC1 testing with this installation option that is still being investigated.  Please do not select the GELI encryption option from the installer.  Although the installation successfully completes, the GELI passphrase will not decrypt the GELI provider.
  • Build Hyper-V kernel modules by default for i386.
  • Update oce(4) driver to support 40Gbps devices.
  • Improve robustness of the Xen balloon driver.
  • Fix accounting for hw.realmem on the i386 and amd64 platforms.
  • Fix poweroff(8) on XenServer.
  • Fix powerd/states on AMD cpus.
  • Add support for BCM57764, BCM57767, BCM57782, BCM57786 and BCM57787.
  • Fix PKG_ABI detection in bsdconfig(8) after pkg-1.2.
  • Fix emulated jail_v0 byte order.
  • Fix hang on reboot with active iSCSI connections.
  • Fix a potential system crash if a jail(8) is created and destroyed on systems with VIMAGE.

Faces of FreeBSD – Brooks Davis

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who gives back to FreeBSD financially or in another way. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Brooks' Story



I’m a Senior Software Engineer for SRI International, working on multiple clean slate research projects using FreeBSD as the operating system for research on the hardware-software interface.  A  FreeBSD committer since 2001 and core team member from 2006 through 2012, I've built an HPC cluster based on FreeBSD, implemented an internal source code sharing system with FreeBSD and Trac, and most recently helped port FreeBSDto an open source CPU to enable architecture, systems, and security research.  I've also helped drive our transition from a GNU toolchain to a more modern LLVM based toolchain.

Outside the world of computing I’m a foodie, gardener, home brewer of beer, mead and cider, woodworker, and blacksmith.

My first exposure to FreeBSD was a floppy disk-based SLIP router installed in my high school in 1993/4 by a local FreeBSD-based ISP.  Distracted as a Solaris admin during college, I returned to FreeBSD almost immediately after graduation when FreeBSDmade it trivial to set up a PPP router at home.  The Aerospace Corporation, my first post-college job, involved working with FreeBSD due to our extensive use of dummynet in our research labs.  Over the next decade-plus I spread FreeBSDfrom the lab to the largest computing cluster at the company and to an internal sourceforge.net-like system hosting over 350 projects.

Now I work to make FreeBSD better, such as working on toolchain and build system issues with a focus on medium to large embedded systems.  Our research group developed an open source CPU based on the 64-bit MIPS ISA that we use to explore the hardware-software interface.  I maintained Clang and LLVM ports, enhanced the FreeBSD build and release system to work without root permissions, and wrote and modified device drivers for our platform. I also maintained a number of high performance computing related ports including Sun Grid Engine and Ganglia as well as a number of Trac modules.  

One of the reasons I like FreeBSD is the community involved in the process of building a principled, technically-advanced operating system platform. Not only do we produce a great product, but we have fun doing it.

I appreciate how the FreeBSD Foundationhas helped me both directly and indirectly to attend conferences, developer’s meetings, vendor summits, and events like Google Summer of Code mentors summits.  I’ve received travel grants for a number of these events and the FreeBSD Foundation sponsors many BSD conferences where I have presented, including AsiaBSDCon, BSDCan, EuroBSDCon, and BSDDay Argentina.

Donating to the FreeBSD Foundation is an easy way to support FreeBSD. Even the smallest donation helps as your mere presence as a donator demonstrates community support. I'm excited by the early results of the FreeBSD Foundation’s recent expansion of staff and look forward to continued growth.  I donate every year.

Brooks Davis


Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/



The Ports Management Team 2013-12-09 15:19:23

In this week’s interview, we talk to Baptiste Daroussin, who brought us such things as poudriere, pkgng, etc.

Name

Baptiste Daroussin

Committer name

bapt

Inspiration for your IRC nick

Baptiste is too long to type

TLD of origin

.fr

Occupation

Unix system engineer in general

When did you join portmgr@

May 2011

<Editor’s note: here is the video of bapt getting recruited, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZk__K8rqOg >

Blog

http://blog.etoilebsd.net

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

I started using FreeBSD as a student in 2001/2002 and never left it since

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

According to ports/86401 barner@ was

Who was your mentor(s)

In the ports land: jadawin@ and tabthorpe@
In the src land: des@

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

There are too much of them to be able just pick one like this.

Boxers / Briefs / other

Boxers

What is your role in your circle of friends

Depend on the circle

vi(m) / emacs / other

vim

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

FreeBSD is a fantastic Operatic System with a crappy package system
The ports needs lots of cleanup and modernization,
The package system still need lots of love.

Favourite musician/band

I like lots of different kind of music, if I have to choose just one band I
would say Metallica from before they mess up (I let fan decide themself when
they started to mess up)

What book do you have on your bedside table

The Restraint of Beasts by Magnus Mills

coffee / tea / other

coffee

Favourite whisky

Old Pultney

Do you have a guilty pleasure

Add french words to the FreeBSD user vocabulary

How would you describe yourself

Hey

sendmail / postfix / other

OpenSMTPD

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

I do play rugby on a regular basis, I love reading books (real books not
e-something), party with friends etc.

What is your favourite TV show

I do not watch much television

Claim to Fame

pkgng, poudrière, USES, new options framework for the ports tree, staging area
support for the ports tree, more to come :)

What did you have for breakfast today

Chocapics :)

What sports team do you support

I love practicing but I not particularly supporting any team.

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

I’m trying to lean pf code and see how complicated it is to sync features from
OpenBSD’s version (I said trying :))

I maintain some contrib code in base: mostly m4 and byacc

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I keep refraining myself from forking the ports tree into a portsng thing :)
(not sure most people don’t know that)

Any parting words you want to share

Any volunteer to document my work?

What is your .sig at the moment

regards,
Bapt

FreeBSD

The first RC build for the FreeBSD-10.0 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

PC-BSD Weekly Feature Digest 12/6/13

It’s finally here!!  Earlier this week the PC-BSD team released a new test image for version 10.0.  Some of the exciting highlights were the addition of mate / gnome3/ cinnamon into the installer and package manager.   The linux compatibility layer has also been upgraded to the Linux Centos 6 compatibility layer which will be fantastic for the long run, but right now you may notice your internet browsers are not handling video properly in version 10.0.  We have new PBI’s on the way that should solve this problem and get your Youtube watching experience back up and running…I mean who wants to live in a world without Justin Bieber…am I right…??  OK put your hands down people that wasn’t a literal question!   Anyways I digress!  here is what’s going on in the PC-BSD universe this week.

We are trying to collect information on how all of you feel about the ease of use of installing a printer on PC-BSD.  We want to know the Good, the bad, and the ugly of your printer installation experience, including if you are having trouble finding a driver for your particular model of printer.   To participate in our poll for the next 2 weeks please go to: http://forums.pcbsd.org/showthread.php?t=21460

I am looking for users that are willing to test functionality of HPLIP (in package manager under drivers) while using non-HP printers.  More specifically if you have any brand of printer besides HP i’m looking for users that will add this package and see if it breaks or conflicts with your current printer’s setup.  Understand this is strictly volunteer and advanced users are recommended in case of any potential breakage.  PLEASE NOTE:  There is a known issue I ran into with Mate and the HPLIP package.  DO NOT install HPLIP right now while running mate or it will nuke your taskbar leaving you helpless to accomplish anything.  We are looking into a fix on this and hope to have one shortly.

We are well aware of the bugs corresponding to users with Grub as their boot manager for versions of 9.0 and 10.0.  While we believe we have isolated the issue we are still tracking down the root cause of the problem.  If you are experiencing problems with Grub please go to: http://trac.pcbsd.org/ticket/748 and add any thoughts or diagnostic information that might help us locate the problem.

On a similar note some of you will be glad to know that the ability to pick between the FreeBSD bootloader or the Grub boot loader has now been added back into the installer for version 10.0.  This may be especially helpful on systems that Grub is whining about booting from.

Many 10.0 PBI’s are finishing building over the weekend so you should see a pretty big influx of new PBI’s in the appcafe soon.  We will be systematically testing and working our way through them starting early next week.  EasyPBI is also receiving a big update for version 10, so some functionality may be missing or altogether not working for the time being.  Ken is planning on the updates being finished in the next week to be fully compatible with the 10.0 PBI system.

That’s it for this week folks.  Thanks for being a part of the PC-BSD community, and tune in next week for more exciting PC-BSD news!

P.S.  Just kidding on the date before the edit…Just wanted to make sure everyone was paying attention ;) .

 

FreeBSD 10.0-BETA4 now available

The fourth BETA build of the 10.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

This is expected to be the final BETA build of the 10.0-RELEASE cycle.

Checksums for the installation images are available in the announcement email.

If you notice problems you can report them through the PR system or on the -current mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "stable/10" branch.

Important note to freebsd-update(8) users:  Please be sure to follow the instructions in the following FreeBSD Errata Notices before upgrading the system to 10.0-BETA4:

  • http://www.freebsd.org/security/advisories/FreeBSD-EN-13:04.freebsd-update.asc
  • http://www.freebsd.org/security/advisories/FreeBSD-EN-13:05.freebsd-update.asc

Changes between -BETA3 and -BETA4 include:

  • Add preliminary support for RTL8106E, RTL8168G, RTL8168GU, RTL8411B, and RTL8168EP.
  • Enable fingerprint checking in pkg(8) for FreeBSD-provided binary packages.
  • Remove the WITH_LIBICONV_COMPAT build option.
  • Update nvi to 2.1.2.
  • Various iconv(3) fixes.
  • Fix mergemaster -U by forcing FreeBSD 9 compatiblity in mtree when mtree is nmtree.
  • Fix to freebsd-update(8) in generating the list of old files/directories versus new files/directories (FreeBSD-EN-13:05.freebsd-update).

Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.0-BETA4 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.

Updating FreeBSD 8.2 (or 9.x) to 10 (beta4)

This is a little description how I remotely (no console, booted into multi-user during update, no external services like jails/httpd/… running) updated a FreeBSD 8.2 to 10 (beta4) from source. This should also work when updating from FreeBSD 9.x. Note, I had already switched to ATA_CAM on 8.2, so not instructions for the name change of the ata devices. No IPv6, WLAN or CARP is in use here, so changes which are needed in this area are not covered. Read UPDATING carefully, there are a lot of changes between major releases.

What I did:

  • update /usr/src
  • make buildworld
  • replace “make ” in /usr/src/Makefile.inc1 with ${MAKE} (two times, one for “VERSION”, one for “BRANCH”)
  • verify kernel config for changes needed (running “config MyKernel” in /usr/src/sys/YourArch/conf/ helps to identify syntax problems), sorry I didn’t take notes, but I diffed the old and the new GENERIC config and added/removed according to my interests
  • /usr/obj/…/src/usr.bin/bmake/make buildkernel KERNCONF=MyKernel
  • /usr/obj/…/src/usr.bin/bmake/make installkernel KERNCONF=MyKernel KODIR=/boot/kernel.10
  • mergemaster –p
  • /usr/obj/…/src/usr.bin/bmake/make installworld DESTDIR=/somewhere/test
  • mkdir /root/net10; cp /somewhere/test/rescue/ifconfig /somewhere/test/rescue/route /root/net10
  • create the file /etc/rc.10update with:
    case $(uname –r) in
    8.2*)
            MYIFCONFIG=/sbin/ifconfig
            MYROUTE=/sbin/route
            ;;
    10*)
            MYIFCONFIG=/root/net10/ifconfig
            MYROUTE=/root/net10/route
            ;;
    esac
    export MYIFCONFIG
    export MYROUTE
  • change the files (stupid approach: grep for “ifconfig” and “route” in /etc/rc.d to identify files which need to change, I skipped files which I identified as not needed in my case, if you use pf/IPv6/bridge/…, you may have to change some more files) /etc/rc.d/auto_linklocal /etc/rc.d/defaultroute /etc/rc.d/netif /etc/rc.d/netwait /etc/rc.d/routing: add “. /etc/rc.10update” at the end of the block with “. /etc/rc.subr”, change the “ifconfig”-command to ${MYIFCONFIG}, change the “route”-command to ${MYROUTE}
  • change /etc/network.subr: add “. /etc/rc.10update” before the first function, change the “ifconfig”-command to ${MYIFCONFIG}, change the “route”-command to ${MYROUTE}
  • make sure that the changes you made are 100% correct, rather triple-check than to not check at all (you will be locked out if they are not 100% OK)
  • stop any jails and make sure they do not restart at boot
  • deactivate the gmirror of the root-fs, if there is one (it is maybe easier to ask a remote hand to swap the boot order in case of problems)
  • here you could just a reboot of the server to come back to your current OS version, so make sure that the modifications in /etc did not cause any problems with the old version (in case you see problems with the v10 kernel), but if you do not have a remote console to single-user mode you have no chance to directly fix the problem (risk mitigation described above), no matter which version of the kernel you boot
  • nextboot –k kernel.10
  • shutdown –r now
  • login
  • check dmesg
  • optional: mv /boot/kernel /boot/kernel.8
  • make installkernel KERNCONF=MyKernel
    to have a v10 /boot/kernel
  • make installworld
  • mergemaster
  • make delete-old
  • rm –r /etc/rc.10update /root/net10
  • change rc.conf: add “inet” in ifconfig-aliases
  • review sysctl.conf for outdated entries
  • shutdown –r now
  • optional: rm –r /boot/kernel.10
  • enable jails again (or later… updating jails is not described here)
  • activate/resync mirror(s)
  • rebuild all ports (attention: new pkg system)
  • make delete-old-libs
  • reboot again to make sure everything is OK after the port-rebuild and removal of old libs (a console.log (syslog.conf) helps here

Share

FreeBSD

The fourth BETA build for the FreeBSD-10.0 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

Next 10.0 Image Available

Kris has announced the availability of the next 10.0 image:

The next PC-BSD 10-STABLE image is now available for download!

Disclaimer:

This image is a very early cut of the new stable/10 branch of FreeBSD and is probably only suitable for advanced users or developers. A PKGNG repository is available for this release, however it is missing a number of packages we would normally ship with, such as virtualbox drivers, KDE accessories, etc.

Updating:

If you are updating from an earlier version of 10-STABLE you may need to manually run pkg-static upgrade and remove any conflicting packages. This is due to the switch to Gnome3 and the Linux Centos 6 compatibility layer.

New Features:

  • Includes FreeBSD 10-STABLE / 10.0-BETA3 from 11/20/2013
  • Includes the Gnome3 / Mate / Cinnamon desktops, replacing Gnome2.
  • Updated installer options for text-mode, including ZFS options
  • Improved PBIs support
  • Updated our Linux compatibility layer to Centos 6
  • Numerous bug-fixes

10-STABLE notable features:

  • Updated KMS / AMD driver support
  • ISO file is a hybrid USB file, and can be “dd“ed to a USB media.
  • New text-based installer
  • New UEFI loader on installation media
  • Able to select between GRUB/BSD loaders during installation
  • New desktops! Gnome 3, Mate and Cinnamon
  • And much more!

Reporting Issues:

Found a bug? Please report it, in as much detail as possible, to our Trac database.

Faces of FreeBSD – Reid Linnemann

FACES OF FREEBSD

Each week we are sharing a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. But, it is always from someone who is making a positive difference in the FreeBSD world.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Reid's Story


My name is Reid Linnemann. I am 32 years old and work at Spectra Logic Corporation (Boulder, CO). I grew up in Edmond, Oklahoma, graduating from Oklahoma State University with a BS in Computer Science in 2004.

I worked at the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (Stillwater, OK) developing Zope and Plone applications interfacing with SQL databases and single sign-on services, and CymSTAR, LLC (Broken Arrow, OK) developing and modifying real-time simulation software and implementing DIS for virtual air refueling simulation. I was part of the team that designed and built CymSTAR's  KC-135 BOWST trainer for the Mobility Air Force, and contributed to the development of MAF DMO virtual air refueling standards.

I am a versed C and Python programmer, with a good bit of Java, Perl, Ruby, C++, and other various and sundry languages under my belt. I’m interested in 8 bit AVR microcontrollers in my free time.

I was first introduced to FreeBSD in 1999 when a particular greybeard (the senior technician for my shift at a local ISP) played XBill on an X server in WindowMaker. He said it ran on his FreeBSD machine at home across a dedicated 64k subscriber line, displayed in a little window on his workstation. I was astounded, quickly taken in by the FreeBSD users on my shift, and spent a bleary-eyed overnight session with a pair of coworkers who helped me run FreeBSD 3.4 on my own computer.

FreeBSD was remarkable, available at no cost and developed by a group of people scattered across the globe. Its historical lineage to BSD, design philosophy, and professional community stood out. I could examine the source code, and read reams of manual pages documenting every program, libc function, and configuration file if I wanted.

I used the system to build and install ports, and explored, getting actively involved in the mailing lists and forums, studying, passing on my own limited knowledge to those who could benefit from it. I pursued my career in the open source software world, learning the differences in BSD and GNU licensing and the fragmented nature of Linux distributions, realizing the FreeBSD community was more mature and well distributed about industry, education, and research. Everything steered me towards working with and on FreeBSD.

I decided to work for FreeBSD in a professional capacity by the time I was 30, and so here I am, at Spectra Logic, fulfilling that goal. I am part of a team developing a product that will be powered by FreeBSD. Now I find myself in the midst of several prominent FreeBSDdevelopers, the most professional and disciplined software engineers I’ve met, and look forward to learning from them, contributing to FreeBSD, and becoming more involved in the project. Perhaps you'll see me one day at BSDCan or EuroBSDCon. I hope so.

Reid Linnemann

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

The Ports Management Team 2013-12-02 15:31:58

As port of the ongoing series on getting to know your portmgr@, I interview the portmgr-secretary@, Thomas Abthorpe.  (Yes it is awkward talking about myself in third person)

Name

Thomas Abthorpe

Committer name

tabthorpe

Inspiration for your IRC nick

Uninterestingly, just my uid that I have had in near continuous use since 1989

TLD of origin

CA

Occupation

Regional Technical Support Specialist with the Canadian Grain Commission

When did you join portmgr@

Joined as -secretary in March 2010
Upgraded to full member in March 2011

Blog

http://www.abthorpe.org

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

I wanted to run a webserver, and I wanted something free. I was going
to use something linux, then met up with a former prof from university,
and shared my story with him. He told me FreeBSD was the way to go.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

clsung, miwi, rafan

Who was your mentor(s)

clsung/miwi

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

I reset a bunch of ports that were name@??.FreeBSD.org, because my
script was only checking for @FreeBSD.org. I was called on it
privately, to which I immediately reverted my commit.

Boxers / Briefs / other

Boxers

What is your role in your circle of friends

Oddly enough, social convener

vi(m) / emacs / other

vim

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

I just love that I (and anybody for that matter) can contribute the most
trivial of things, and watch it go live.

Favourite musician/band

Favourite of all time is The Beatles. On the home front, I am huge fan
of the Canadian band Barenaked Ladies. I was so fortunate to even meet
them back stage at a concert in 1997.

What book do you have on your bedside table

The Beardmore Relics. It is a fictionalised story of hoax about
viking relics that were discovered near Beardmore, ON, a little
community I lived in back in the late 70s.

 coffee / tea / other

Coffee, intravenous if possible!

Favourite whisky

Springbank

Do you have a guilty pleasure

Sitting around in comfortable lounge wear, watching Sci-Fi on TV

How would you describe yourself

N-Space, multidimensional nerd.

sendmail / postfix / other

sendmail for internal use, postfix for anything exposed to the Internet

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

I am a senior apprentice bicycle mechanic with a grass roots movement
called Bicycles for Humanity

What is your favourite TV show

Big Bang Theory. Physics was my other interest I followed in
university. The interaction among the friends, is uncannily similar as
that among my friends. Fortunately we have no Sheldon. And Barenaked
Ladies do the theme song :)

Love almost anything Sci-Fi, particularly the old Stargate franchise(s), Dr. Who
Sanctuary, etc, etc, etc.

Claim to Fame

Don’t really think I have one

What did you have for breakfast today

Coffee and a bagel.  I have that almost everyday, so when I say to people,
“You expect me to remember BLAH? I don’t remember what I had for
breakfast yesterday?” there is an implied irony.

What sports team do you support

Pro hockey – The one and only Montreal Canadiens
Pro lacrosse – The Toronto Rock
University hockey – Lakehead University Thunderwloves

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

core@, donations@, formerly kde@

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I used to play the bagpipes. Was “fair” at it. My band was invited to
play at the “Toys on Parage” in Santa Ana CA back in 1987. Astronaut
Neil Armstrong was the parade marshall, and I can claim that I was at a
black tie reception with him. I was performing with the band, and I wasn’t
allowed to get near him, but I can at least say I “partied” with him.

Any parting words you want to share

Always remember the Golden Rule, “Do unto others, before others do unto you”,
or something like that :)

What is your .sig at the moment

Thomas Abthorpe | FreeBSD Committer
[email protected] | http://people.freebsd.org/~tabthorpe

Moving forward by going slightly backwards and to the right, UEFI booting on #FreeBSD

The FreeBSD Foundation has been working towards the future of booting in x86 and catching up to our friends in Linux-land by sponsoring work on a UEFI enabled boot loader.  This work was taken on by Benno Rice ([email protected]) and Ed Maste ([email protected]).

So far, it appears that one can indeed boot FreeBSD as I will demonstrate on my Thinkpad T520.

Starting with the UEFI project branch, one must build a 64bit version of libstand in tree.

cd uefi/lib/libstand && make

Modify the makefile in sys/boot/amd64

Index: amd64/efi/Makefile
===================================================================
— amd64/efi/Makefile    (revision 258775)
+++ amd64/efi/Makefile    (working copy)
@@ -77,8 +77,8 @@
LIBEFI=        ${.OBJDIR}/../../efi/libefi/libefi.a
CFLAGS+=    -I${.CURDIR}/../../common

-DPADD=        ${LIBFICL} ${LIBEFI} ${LIBSTAND}
-LDADD=        ${LIBFICL} ${LIBEFI} ${LIBSTAND}
+DPADD=        ${LIBFICL} ${LIBEFI} ../../../../lib/libstand/libstand.a
+LDADD=        ${LIBFICL} ${LIBEFI} ../../../../lib/libstand/libstand.a

.include <bsd.prog.mk>

Now you can build loader.efi and get it to link against the 64bit version of libstand:

cd sys/boot && make

UEFI will look for a FAT formatted partition with the “efi” signature on it.  FreeBSD’s gpart can create this partition for you, so do the following foo:

gpart create -s gpt da0

gpart add -t efi da0

gpart add -t freebsd-ufs da0

$ gpart show da0
=>     34  2013117  da0  GPT  (983M)
34   131072    1  efi  (64M)
131106  1882045    2  freebsd-ufs  (919M)

newfs -t msdosfs /dev/da0p1

newfs /dev/da0p2

Mount the fat formatted partition, create the EFI directory structure(this is mandatory) and copy the loader.efi binary into place as bootx64.efi

mount -t msdosfs /dev/da0p1 /mnt

mkdir -p /mnt/efi/boot

cp uefi/sys/boot/amd64

Because the kernel currently needs to be aware of the new style UEFI memory map, you can’t run stock -current in this configuration.  You’ll need to use a kernel from the projects/uefi branch when constructing your bootable device.  I used a 1G usb thumbdrive for this test, so mount the UFS partition and use it as a DESTDIR for your installworld/installkernel:

make -s buildworld

make -s buildkernel

mount /dev/da0p2 /mnt

DESTDIR=/mnt make -s installworld

DESTDIR=/mnt make -s installkernel

DESTDIR=/mnt make -s distribution

Setup an /etc/fstab on this stick:

/dev/da0p2             /               ufs     rw,              1       1

At this point, your USB disk is ready for its first booting attempt.

EFI_BIOS

EFI_LOADER1

I have to toggle UEFI/Legacy BIOS mode in my laptop.  For your entertainment, here it is.  This has the convient side effect of not booting from my other disk devices in my laptop as they do not have the “proper” fat formatted EFI partition on them.  This actually yeilds a pretty quick boot to the loader.

Amazing!  It did!  Sort of.

Now we have the entertainment of trying to figure out how to get here to multiuser.

 

 

 

EFI_LOADER2

With a “show” we find out that the loader has selected the EFI partition “part6″ as the boot device.  “lsdev” shows us all the partitions that we could boot from, but I have chosen well in this example and can easily see that the one I really want is tagged with a “(removable)”.

In this case executing a “set currdev=part7″ sets up the loader to boot and executing “boot” will get this system into multiuser.

Many thanks to the folks at the FreeBSD Foundation for these initial steps into UEFI.  The project branch in subversion is publicly available and I highly encourage folks to engage the community to get this closer to production grade.

ruBSD 2013

ruBSD 2013 (http://tech.yandex.ru/events/yagosti/ruBSD/), St. Leo Tolstoy, Moscow, Russia 14 December, 2013. The first Russian technical conference on the BSD family of operation systems, held December 14, 2013 in the Yandex Moscow office. It is intended for system administrators and programmers. Objectives of the conference include new technologies in the BSD world, and discussion and examples of BSD-based systems. Participation is free, but registration is required. Seats are limited. If you register but cannot attend, please let us know.

NYCBSDCon 2014

NYCBSDCon 2014 (http://www.nycbsdcon.org/2014/), Suspender Bar & Restaurant, Manhattan, New York City, United States 8 February, 2014. A day-long event with a theme of "The BSDs in Production." With increased focus on the critical roles the BSDs do and can play in infrastructures, NYCBSDCon promises to be an important event for the technical community in the New York metropolitan area. Hosted by the New York City *BSD User Group.

Faces of FreeBSD – Gabor Pali

Faces of FreeBSD

Each week we are going to share a story from someone involved in FreeBSD. This is our Faces of FreeBSD series. It may be a story from someone who’s received funding from us to work on development projects, run conferences, travel to conferences, or advocate for FreeBSD. Or, it may be from someone who contributes financially to the foundation.

Here’s a chance to get to know your fellow FreeBSD enthusiast. Sit back and enjoy another 2013 Faces of FreeBSD story.

Gábor’s Story



My name is Gábor Páli, I am 31 years old, from Hungary, and I teach (and study) functional programming at the Eötvös Loránd University, Faculty of Informatics (Budapest).  I have a master’s degree (Debrecen, Hungary) and a doctorate (Cluj-Napoca, Romania) in Computer Science.

Before this I was a game engine programmer at Invictus Games, working on Project Torque (known as Level-R outside North America), then a research intern at Chalmers University of Technology (Gothenburg, Sweden), and recently at the Computer Laboratory (Cambridge, UK), participating in research projects on functional programming and operating systems, such as Feldspar and Mirage.

When not working, I am an average geek who enjoys reading books on science, philosophy, and art, chatting with friends, playing good old computer games, watching art movies, drawing, listening to underground music, and consuming excessive amounts of fine Japanese or Chinese teas.

I discovered FreeBSD in 2000 while working on my master’s. I met János Háber, who admired the technical merits of FreeBSD and recommended it over the popular and widespread GNU/Linux distributions. I downloaded FreeBSD 4.3-RELEASE, found it reliable, consistent, easy to install, update and use. I especially liked the Ports Collection, as it helped me find further useful and valuable free software.

I’ve contributed to the FreeBSD Project since 2008: I translated the complete FreeBSDHandbook and other documentation into Hungarian and took over and revitalized the FreeBSD stack of the Haskell programming language, including making FreeBSD Tier-1 for the Glasgow Haskell Compiler and providing ports for hundreds of third party Haskell libraries. 

I volunteered to take over organization of the EuroBSDcon FreeBSD Developer Summits in 2010 and have organized in Karlsruhe (Germany), Maarssen (Netherlands), Warsaw (Poland) and most recently in St. Julian's (Malta).  I’ve run a mini version of EuroBSDcon, called BSD-Day, in Budapest (Hungary), Bratislava (Slovakia), Vienna (Austria), and Naples (Italy).

I’m secretary of the FreeBSD Core Team (since 2012), and maintain the agenda, organize meetings, publish internal, external reports and notices, handle commit bit requests for the source code repository, collaborate with the FreeBSD Foundation, and remind the Core Team members about their pending tasks. I also manage the quarterly status reports.

I like FreeBSD because of the community, and the ability to find and push my limits. I enjoy contributing toFreeBSD because it inspires me and gives me hands-on experience that can’t be bought. I enjoy learning from FreeBSD experts around the globe, and am impressed with what has been achieved over the years. I recognize the outstanding stability and reliability of FreeBSD, the ability to configure systems to maximize efficiency, and FreeBSD’s use as a research platform. I appreciate how the FreeBSD Projectwelcomes and utilizes innovative ideas.

The FreeBSD Foundation gave me a travel grant for EuroBSDcon 2012. They were a main sponsor of the BSD-Day events, and covered half the cost of the Developer Summit in Malta. I am very grateful for this support, as they would not be possible without the generous funds.

The Developer Summits allow developers the space to personally meet and to discuss issues they could not over the Internet. It’s important to be able to attach a face to an Internet personality; sometimes the harshest, stubborn members are the nicest people in real life.

The BSD-Day events that I organize allow cities and countries to have their own BSD conference at a much smaller cost. BSD-Days have less formalities and pressure, yet they retain most of the traditions and ambience of the large conferences of EuroBSDcon, on a smaller budget.

Donating to the FreeBSD Foundation is a great way to express your appreciation for the work of the FreeBSD Project.  Your donation makes it possible for developers to dedicate their time to complete long-awaited projects, or brings developers from overseas to technical conferences such as EuroBSDcon. This is something that would not happen without your support.

Gábor Páli

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. To make a donation go to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

The Ports Management Team 2013-11-25 15:38:23

In this interview, we talk to Martin Wilke, aka miwi, the high quality automated PR and commit bot.

Name

Martin Wilke

Committer name

miwi

Inspiration for your IRC nick

MartIn WIlke

TLD of origin

Ger

Current TLD (if different from above)

My

Occupation

System Administrator

When did you join portmgr@

Jun 4 08:35:57 UTC 2009 (actually a few hours earlier because we did
know that already)

Blog

http://miwi.cc (I did not write anything in ages ^^)

Inspiration for using FreeBSD

Can I use a shout cart?
http://miwi.cc/2012/03/why-freebsd-my-personal-view/ that should explain it
quite well I think.

Who was your first contact in FreeBSD

To be honest, I think many because I spam GNATS quiet heavily :)

Who was your mentor(s)

Krion (wave)

What was your most embarrassing moment in FreeBSD

If you want to know, see my commit history, you will find a lot :(

Boxers / Briefs / other

Boxers

vi(m) / emacs / other

vi(m)/mcedit :)

What keeps you motivated in FreeBSD

Still the community

Favourite musician/band

Gerneral I still like and listen a lot to of German Hip Hop (I still feel
very young!)

What book do you have on your bedside table.

Book? Can I eat that?

coffee / tea / other

black coffee

Do you have a guilty pleasure

Hm..

How would you describe yourself

Shy :)

sendmail / postfix / other

postfix

Do you have a hobby outside of FreeBSD

When you have kids there is not much time left for hobbies :)

What is your favourite TV show

Stargate*, House

Claim to Fame

miwibot and friends ..

What did you have for breakfast today

Rotti Chanai, Ice Milo

What sports team do you support

I keep on following F1 and hope a other German Driver will win ..

What else do you do in the world of FreeBSD

Trying to clean up bapts stuff *gg* (joking), lately I helped a lot
on the cluster setup / package packaging.

What can you tell us about yourself that most people don’t know

I canâ~@~Yt else you will know :)

<Editor note: this is a copy and paste, something may have been lost in translation>

Any parting words you want to share.

Have a nice day!

What is your .sig at the moment

Mess with the best, die like the rest :).